Surrogacy Regulation Bill introduced in Lok Sabha

first_imgThe bill, introduced by Health and Family Welfare Minister Harsh Vardhan, stipulates the constitution of surrogacy boards at the national and state levels. The couples will not be able to abandon a child produced through surrogacy under any condition.The legislation seeks to “allow ethical altruistic surrogacy to the intending infertile Indian married couple between the age of 23-50 years and 26-55 years for female and male, respectively”. A woman should be allowed to act as a surrogate mother only once. She should be between 25 and 35 years of age and should be a close relative of the intending couple. She should be married and have a child of her own.India has emerged as a surrogacy hub for couples from different countries over the past few years. The statement of objectives of the bill said: “Due to lack of legislation to regulate surrogacy, the practice of surrogacy has been misused by surrogacy clinics, which leads to rampant commercial surrogacy and unethical practices…”The bill was passed by Lok Sabha in December, 2018, but it lapsed. Cabinet clears Bill that bars commercial surrogacy Mother, Maybe Over to the elders Related News By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 16, 2019 3:09:54 am surrogacy bill, surrogacy regulations bill, india surrogacy, india surrogacy bill, surrogacy regulations india, lok sabha surrogacy bill, surrogacy in india, commercial surrogacy, altruistic surrogacy The bill was passed by Lok Sabha in December, 2018, but it lapsed.The Government introduced the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2019 in the Lok Sabha today cwhich would ban commercial surrogacy and allow only close relatives to act as surrogates to infertile couples for “ethical altruistic” reasons. Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

VR found to be effective in reducing perceived pain during exercise

first_img Source:https://www.kent.ac.uk/news/science/19368/virtual-reality-can-reduce-pain-and-increase-performance-during-exercise Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 1 2018The research, led by PhD candidate Maria Matsangidou from EDA, set out to determine how using VR while exercising could affect performance by measuring a raft of criteria: heart rate, including pain intensity, perceived exhaustion, time to exhaustion and private body consciousness.To do this they monitored 80 individuals performing an isometric bicep curl set at 20% of the maximum weight they could lift, which they were then asked to hold for as long as possible. Half of the group acted as a control group who did the lift and hold inside a room that had a chair, a table and yoga mat on the floor.Related StoriesSupervised fun, exercise both improve psychosocial health of children with obesityImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsResearchers identify molecular pathway underpinning exercise and improved motor learningThe VR group were placed in the same room with the same items. They then put on a VR headset and saw the same environment, including a visual representation of an arm and the weight (see image below). They then carried out the same lift and hold as the non-VR group.The results showed a clear reduction in perception of pain and effort when using VR technology. The data showed that after a minute the VR group had reported a pain intensity that was 10% lower than the non-VR group.Furthermore the time to exhaustion for the VR group was around two minutes longer than those doing conventional exercise. The VR group also showed a lower heart rate of three beats per minute than the non-VR group.Results from the study also showed no significant effect of private body consciousness on the positive impact of VR. Private body consciousness is the subjective awareness each of us has to bodily sensations.Previous research has shown that individuals who have a high private body consciousness tend to better understand their body and as a result perceive higher pain when exercising. However, the study’s findings revealed that VR was effective in reducing perceived pain and that private body consciousness did not lessen this effect.As such, the improvements shown by the VR group suggest that it could be a possible way to encourage less active people to exercise by reducing the perceived pain that exercise can cause and improving performance, regardless of private body consciousness.Lead researcher Maria Matsangidou said: ‘It is clear from the data gathered that the use of VR technology can improve performance during exercise on a number of criteria. This could have major implications for exercise regimes for everyone, from occasional gym users to professional athletes.’last_img read more

Adolescents who use cognitive reappraisal had better metabolic measures shows study

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 14 2018Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to Penn State researchers.The researchers explored whether the strategies adolescents used to deal with chronic family stress affected various metabolic and immune processes in the body. Strategies could include cognitive reappraisal — trying to think of the stressor in a more positive way — and suppression, or inhibiting the expression of emotions in reaction to a stressor.The team found that when faced with greater chronic family stress, teens who used cognitive reappraisal had better metabolic measures, like blood pressure and waist-to-hip ratio. Teens who were more likely to use suppression tended to have more inflammation when their immune cells were exposed to a bacterial stimulus in the lab, even in the presence of anti-inflammatory signals.Hannah Schreier, assistant professor of biobehavioral health at Penn State, said the results suggest that the coping skills teens develop by the time they are adolescents have the potential to impact their health later in life.”These changes are not something that will detrimentally impact anyone’s health within a week or two, but that over years or decades could make a difference,” Schreier said. “That may be how small changes in metabolic or inflammatory outcomes may become associated with poorer health or a greater chance of developing a chronic disease later in life.”Emily Jones, graduate student in biobehavioral health at Penn State, said the results — recently published in Psychosomatic Medicine — help therapists and counselors better work with children and adolescents who live in stressful environments.”Exposure to chronic stress doesn’t always lead to poorer health outcomes, in part because of differences among people,” Jones said. “As our study findings suggest, there may be ways to help someone be more resilient in the face of stress by encouraging certain emotion regulation strategies. For children in stressful living situations, we can’t always stop the stressors from happening, but we may be able to help youth deal with that stress.”Although previous research has linked chronic stress during childhood with such conditions as depression, autoimmune disorders and cardiovascular disease, the researchers said less is known about why some people under chronic stress develop these conditions while others do not. While it was thought that emotional regulation may play a role, the researchers were not sure exactly how.Related StoriesUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol useTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceNew ACC/AHA guidelines could improve detection of gestational hypertensionTo better explore how different ways of regulating emotions can affect different aspects of physical health, the researchers gathered data from 261 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 16 years.The researchers interviewed the participants about the relationships and chronic stress within their families, as well as measured the participants’ waist-to-hip ratios and blood pressure. The adolescents also completed questionnaires about how they regulated their emotions.To measure immune function, the researchers took blood samples from each participant and exposed the blood to a bacterial stimulus — both with and without the anti-inflammatory substance hydrocortisone — to see how the immune cells would respond.The researchers found that under conditions of greater chronic family stress, the immune cells of adolescents who were more likely to use suppression also tended to produce more pro-inflammatory cytokines, molecules that signal to other cells that there is a threat present and that the body’s immune system needs to kick into gear.The cells of these teens produced more cytokines even in the presence of hydrocortisone, an anti-inflammatory substance that usually tells the body to slow down on producing cytokines.”Cytokines are like messengers that communicate to the rest of the body that added support is needed,” Jones said. “So when you have a high level of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, even in the presence of anti-inflammatory messages from cortisol, it may suggest that your body is mounting an excessive inflammatory response, more so than necessary. It suggests that the immune system may not be functioning as it should be.”Meanwhile, the researchers found that adolescents who tended to use cognitive reappraisal while under more family stress had smaller waist-to-hip ratios — a measurement used as an indicator of health and chronic disease risk — and lower blood pressure.”While we would have to follow up with more studies, the results could lend support to the idea that reappraising a situation during times of stress could be beneficial,” Jones said. “For a mild stressor, this could be as simple as reframing a bad situation by thinking about it as a challenge or an opportunity for growth.”The researchers added that opportunities for future studies could include looking at the effects of emotion regulation strategies on these metabolic and immune measures over time to tease apart how the family environment shapes emotion regulation, how emotion regulation may itself influence stress exposure, and how chronic family stress and emotion regulation together can affect chronic disease risk in the long run.Source: https://news.psu.edu/ read more

Neuroscientists decipher how brain circuits optimize themselves

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 2 2019Human beings, like other animals, possess an enormous learning capacity that allows for the apprehension of new sensory information to master new skills or to adapt to an ever-changing environment. However, many of the mechanisms that enable us to learn remain poorly understood. One of the greatest challenges of systems neuroscience is to explain how synaptic connections change to support adaptive behaviors. Neuroscientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, previously showed that synaptic learning mechanisms in the brain’s cortex are dependent on feedback from deeper brain regions. They have now precisely deciphered how this feedback gates synaptic strengthening by switching on and off particular inhibitory neurons. This study, which can be read in Neuron, not only constitutes an important milestone in our understanding of the mechanisms for perceptual learning but may also offer insight into computerized learning systems and artificial intelligence.The cortex – the brain’s outer and largest region – is important for higher cognitive functions, complex behaviors, perception, and learning. Upon the arrival of a sensory stimulus, the cortex processes and filters its information before it passes the most relevant aspects on to other brain regions. Some of these brain regions, in turn, send information back to the cortex. These loops, known as “feedback systems”, are thought to be essential for the functioning of cortical networks and their adaptation to new sensory information. “For perceptual learning – which is the improved ability to respond to a sensory stimulus – neuronal circuits need to first assess the importance of the incoming sensory information and then refine the way it is processed in the future. Feedback systems to a degree confirm that those synapses that were responsible for transmitting the information to other brain areas did this correctly”, explains Anthony Holtmaat, professor in basic neurosciences at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, who directed this study.How the whiskers highlight the feedback systemsThe whiskers on a mouse’s snout are specialized in tactile sensing and play a major role in the animal’s ability to comprehend aspects of its direct environment. The part of the cortex that processes sensory information from the whiskers continuously optimizes its synapses in order to learn new aspects about the tactile environment. Therefore, it constitutes an interesting model for understanding the role of feedback systems in synaptic learning mechanisms.The UNIGE scientists isolated a whiskers-related feedback circuit, and used electrodes to measure the electrical activity of neurons in the cortex. They then mimicked the sensory input by stimulating a specific part of the cortex known for processing this information, and, at the same time, used light to control the feedback circuit. “This ex vivo model allowed us to control the feedback independently from the sensory input, which is impossible to do in vivo. However, disconnecting the sensory input from the feedback was essential to understanding how the interplay between the two leads to synaptic strengthening” adds Holtmaat.Inhibiting neurons gate the informationRelated StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustThe team found that both components, when triggered separately, activate a wide range of neurons. However, when activated simultaneously, some neurons actually decrease their activity. “Interestingly, the neurons that are inhibited when the sensory input and the feedback occur together usually inhibit neurons that are important for perception, this is known as an inhibition of inhibition or a disinhibition”, explains Leena Williams from the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, the study’s first author. “Thus, these neurons act like a gate for the incoming information, and which is normally closed. But when feedback comes in, the gate is opened, allowing those synapses that take care of the primary sensory information to increase their strength. With this study we have identified how feedback possibly optimizes synaptic connections to better prepare for future incoming information”, she adds.Now that they have precisely identified which neurons are involved in this mechanism, these scientists will test their results in “real life” to check whether the inhibiting neurons will behave as predicted when a mouse needs to learn new sensory information or when it discovers new aspects in its tactile environment.Deep learning: mimicking natural intelligenceHow do brain circuits optimize themselves? How can a system teach itself by reading out its own activity? Apart from being relevant to learning in animals, this question is also at the heart of machine learning programs. Indeed, some deep learning specialists try to mimic brain circuits to build artificially intelligent systems. Insights such as provided by the UNIGE team might be relevant for unsupervised learning, a branch of machine learning that occupies itself with circuit models that are able to self-organize and optimize the processing of new information. This is important for the creation of efficient voice or face recognition programs, for example. Source:https://www.unige.ch/en/last_img read more

Mice sleeping fitfully help unravel mystery of insomnia

first_img Source:https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/mice-sleeping-fitfully-provide-clues-to-insomnia/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 9 2019Genetically engineered mice mimic common sleep problemsMice that sleep fitfully could help researchers unravel the mystery of insomnia.Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied mice genetically modified to mimic the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), which is associated with sleep problems. They found that the animals, like some people with NF1, slept in short, irregular spurts. Studying these mice could help identify the molecular and cellular mechanisms that go awry and cause fragmented sleep patterns in people with and without the disease, the researchers said.”The mice are a tool for us to understand how sleep disturbances arise and how sleep disruption contributes to problems with learning and attention,” said David H. Gutmann, MD, PhD, the Donald O. Schnuck Family Professor of Neurology and the study’s senior author. “This could apply both to people with NF1 and others without NF1 who also have sleep problems.”The findings were published Jan. 4 in the Journal of Sleep Research.As many as half of people with NF1 – a condition that causes benign tumors in the brain and on nerves throughout the body – have difficulty falling or staying asleep. Learning disabilities and attention problems also are common in children with NF1, and both may be exacerbated by poor sleep. But doctors don’t know why some children with NF1 develop sleep problems and others don’t, nor can they do much to help them sleep better.”Right now we just treat children and adults with NF1 and sleep problems like we treat patients without NF1 because we don’t understand what causes them,” said Gutmann, who also directs the Neurofibromatosis Center at Washington University.Related StoriesPoor sleep associated with high blood pressureCBT for insomnia delivered via telemedicine is as effective as face-to-face deliveryUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepCo-first author Corina Anastasaki, PhD, an instructor in neurology, bred mice with a mutation in their Nf1 gene similar to what is seen in people with NF1. Then, co-first author Nicholas Rensing and Michael J. Wong, MD, PhD, the Allen P. and Josephine B. Green Professor of Pediatric Neurology, fitted onto the mice miniature versions of the caps people wear for sleep studies, enabling them to measure brain waves and identify sleep patterns.Mice normally sleep during the day and, like people, cycle several times from deep, dreamless sleep to REM sleep – or dreaming – and back again. Mice with an Nf1 mutation, however, tended to wake up soon after they entered deep sleep. The result was a fragmented, and probably not restful, day of sleep.”Throughout the whole night and day, they fell asleep and woke up when they shouldn’t have,” Anastasaki said. “They fell into deep sleep, but they didn’t stay there.”Although the mice were engineered to mimic human NF1 disease, they could yield insights about the biological underpinnings of sleep in general, which could help people with sleep problems unrelated to NF1. About a third of American adults report some degree of insomnia, and 15 percent have chronic insomnia that lasts three months or more.”It is hard to study sleep problems in people because there are so many factors that influence how well you sleep – maybe you’re stressed out, maybe you’re sick, maybe you’re taking care of a new baby,” Gutmann said. “But now we have a controlled system that we can use to start looking at which cells and proteins are involved, and which biological factors influence sleep quality. Only when we understand the problem better will we be able to find better ways to treat it.”last_img read more

Researchers identify way to improve common treatment for PTSD

first_img Source:https://dellmed.utexas.edu/news/new-research-identifies-potential-ptsd-treatment-improvement Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 19 2019Researchers may have found a way to improve a common treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by changing how the brain learns to respond less severely to fearful conditions, according to research published in Journal of Neuroscience.The study by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School suggests a potential improvement to exposure therapy – the current gold standard for PTSD treatment and anxiety reduction – which helps people gradually approach their trauma-related memories and feelings by confronting those memories in a safe setting, away from actual threat.In a study of 46 healthy adults, researchers compared participants’ emotional reactions to replacing an unpleasant electric shock on the wrist with a surprise neutral tone, instead of simply turning off the shocks. Omitting the feared shocks is the current norm in exposure therapy. The participants’ brain activity was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Their emotional reactions were measured by how much they were sweating from their hands.Related StoriesComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyCompared with simply turning off the shocks, replacing the feared shocks with a neutral tone was associated with stronger activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex – an area critical for learning safety and inhibiting fear. Replacing the feared shock with a simple tone also lowered participants’ emotional reactions to pictures that previously had been associated with the electric shock when participants were tested the next day.”This simple treatment of replacing an expected threat with an innocuous sound resulted in a long-lasting memory of safety, which suggests that the brain may be able to better control its fear response by means of a pretty straightforward, nonpharmaceutical intervention,” says lead study author Joseph Dunsmoor, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Dell Medical School.In the study, Dunsmoor’s team randomly divided participants to two groups – those who had the shock turned off and those who had the shock replaced by a neutral tone. Both groups were exposed to a picture of a face paired with an electric shock on the wrist on day one of the study. The groups were then exposed to the pictures with the shock turned off, or with the shock replaced by the surprising tone. Both groups returned the next day to measure brain activity and emotional reactions to the fear-conditioned pictures.The researchers measured participants’ brain activity to the fear-conditioned pictures using fMRI scans. They also measured participants’ emotional responses to the threat of receiving an electric shock based on the amount of sweat recorded from a hand.”It is well known that the brain learns by surprise,” says Dunsmoor. “Our study suggests that replacing expected aversive events with neutral and unexpected events, even a simple tone, is one way to capture attention so that the brain can learn to regulate fear more effectively.”last_img read more

Special Collection tracks development of new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 25 2019The Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (link is external) (CIDG), which has its editorial base at LSTM, helps prepare systematic reviews related to the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Ahead of World TB Day, this week welcomes the publication of a Special Collection on the Cochrane Library (link is external) that tracks the development of exciting new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and provides a narrative over the last 10 years of how systematic reviews, many of them Cochrane Reviews, have helped informed investment in diagnostics in low- and middle-income countries. The CIDG has also published a Cochrane Review – on linezolid, a drug that has been allocated an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis, underlining the difficulties facing patients with drug-resistant disease; in that potential benefits in cure rates must be balanced against the downside of considerable side effects.Special Collection on diagnosing tuberculosisNew ways of testing whether people have tuberculosis have revolutionised detection and treatment. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the use of a diagnostic test called Xpert®, and since then this test has been evaluated in different populations and settings, and new products have come on to the market. This Special Collection provides a description of the key reviews and global guidelines associated with each developed by the WHO. The collection covers tests for early detection of the disease, tests for drug resistance, tests in people with HIV, tests in children, and tests for latent tuberculosis infection.Karen Steingart, honorary researcher at the LSTM, said, “Accessible diagnostics are critical for ensuring that people are started on appropriate treatment. Based on the evidence, WHO-recommended rapid tests should be replacing microscopy as the initial diagnostic test for tuberculosis.”Steingart K, Gilpin C, Kohli M, Garner P. Cochrane Special Collections. Diagnosing tuberculosis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2019, Issue 3. DOI: SC000034. (link is external)LinezolidTuberculosis drug resistance is a worldwide problem, and linezolid is a drug that may help people with multi-drug resistant disease. The problem is that we still lack high quality information on this form of the disease. All of the drugs have side-effects, which makes it difficult for patients to take them and means that the drugs are more likely to be harmful. Clinicians and patients need fair and independent summaries of the balance between the benefits and harms of these drugs.Related StoriesNew approach to identify faster, more effective TB drug treatment regimensResearchers win $6.2 million grant to study HIV/TB co-infection in childrenUnited Nations sounds alarm bell on drug-resistant infectionsBhagteshwar Singh and his colleagues summarised the evidence from published studies in this recent Cochrane Review. Whilst there are already several reviews in existence, this Cochrane Review was conducted independently to try and summarise the potential advantages in terms of cure, and the associated side effects.The review authors’ data were limited, with 104 participants recruited in two trials. One trial reported a higher rate of cure and lower risk of treatment failure when linezolid was added to conventional treatment, though the review authors had very low certainty in the reported benefit. The other suggested that linezolid causes faster clearance of tuberculosis bacteria from sputum. Harmful effects were common, with about one-fifth of people across 11 other studies having to discontinue linezolid. Reporting of safety and tolerability by studies was poor, preventing a meaningful summary of these important outcomes.The review helps illustrate the difficulties facing patients with drug-resistant disease, and the limited research in evaluating these new drugs, especially in lower income countries.Dr Singh noted, “This is now one of WHO’s core drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis, but we need to be aware of the limited data available, especially on its toxicity. This review helps to highlight the gaps in our knowledge, equip clinicians for informed discussions with patients, and provide policy-makers with an overview for difficult decisions”.Singh B, Cocker D, Ryan H, Sloan DJ. Linezolid for drug‐resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. (link is external)Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2019, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD012836. DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD012836.pub2. Source:https://cidg.cochrane.org/last_img read more

New personalized prosthetic liners could help more amputees walk again

first_imgWe use pressure sensors inside the liner to check that the pressure is not too high, which could cause skin damage.Secondly we use motion capture technology to check that the movement of John’s lower limbs is symmetrical and we also measure him walking across force plates to ensure there is no overloading in his knee, ankle and hip joints.We’ve found this new liner reduces the pressure on the stump significantly, reducing the risk of skin damage and making it more comfortable to walk.We hope this technology will help many amputees in the future.” The researchers are continuing to test and develop this approach, working with John as well as other volunteers joining the study this autumn, to further improve the process and fit of these liners.They hope to demonstrate this approach is economically viable for use in the NHS and believe this can reduce the burden and costs on the NHS as well as dramatically improve the quality of life of amputees using prosthetics. Source:University of Bath By working closely with the NHS rehab team at the Bristol Centre for Enablement we’ve learnt a lot about the real issues faced by amputees.This project came about from conversations with amputees and prosthetists and is focused on providing a new solution that has genuine potential for adoption for the majority of users – rather than just a lucky few with comprehensive health insurance.” CAMERA Centre Manager, Matt Young, added: Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 2019Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day.This potentially life-changing project combines advances in computer science with an innovative manufacturing process to create affordable new personalized prosthetic liners for lower limb amputees.There are more than 45,000 people in England alone who rely on prosthetic limbs, with more than 5,000 people each year having new lower-limb amputations. For these individuals, the interface between their residual limb (the amputation site) and their artificial limb is of critical importance for maintaining healthy, active lives, and a good fit could make the difference in whether or not they walk again.Following an amputation, a person’s residual limb constantly changes in shape and size during the healing process, which can last between 12-18 months. This variation can result in the liner fitting poorly, leading to tissue damage, causing pain and discomfort for amputees. This is exacerbated by patient activity levels and environmental conditions such as hot weather. This discomfort can lead to patients abandoning their prosthesis and rehabilitation regime, instead being forced to rely on a wheelchair.This project, drawing on the expertise of a multidisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Bath’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department for Health and Centre for the Analysis of Motion, Entertainment Research and Applications (CAMERA), is a new approach to providing the liners which fit inside the prosthetic socket that attaches to the artificial leg.Amputees must currently return to their NHS prosthetist every time their limb changes size for their socket to be replaced or adjusted; many times in the first year following amputation. By providing a series of personalized liners of different sizes, that all fit within the same prosthetic socket, the frequency of these visits can be reduced, improving patient well-being and saving the NHS time and money.Using a state-of-the-art scanner which quickly captures 3D shape, the research team precisely scans an amputee’s residuum. The scanned data is then used to create a full digital model of the residuum which is subsequently used to design the personalized liner. The liner is then manufactured using a cryogenic machining technique, negating the need for complex and time-consuming molds.At Bath, the researchers are using a soft polymer neoprene-like material – similar to that used in wetsuits – for the liner, which is more comfortable than the silicon liners used by the NHS. The entire process takes less than a day from scanning right through to the physical liner being fitted.Case study: John RobertsThe Bath researchers are currently trialling this approach with an amputee volunteer John Roberts. He was born with one leg shorter than the other, but despite multiple operations, he suffered years of chronic pain before finally electing for amputation in 2017. After lifelong pain, John found living post-amputation a relief, but as his stump healed, it changed shape over time and the socket of the prosthetic limb began to rub, causing blisters and irritation.To help his socket fit his stump, he currently wears multiple socks and a silicone layer, but with the new liner he can just simply wear this next to his skin because it fits perfectly.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchAre Chronic Pain Relief Drugs for Children Effective?AMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyThis not only gives a more comfortable fit, but makes it easier and faster to fit the limb, meaning John can quickly put on his prosthetic if he needs to get out of bed at night or in the case of a fire.John said: “I’ve been quite active since the amputation, enjoying walking and gardening again, so my stump has changed shape a lot, meaning I have to wear up to six layers of socks to make sure the prosthetic still fits properly.”I’ve had a few issues with rubbing causing blood blisters with my socket. But with this new liner, blisters aren’t really a problem.”The other really good thing is that I can put on my leg quickly in an emergency. I was very impressed with the new liner, it’s amazing what you can do with technology!”To test the new liner, the researchers inserted pressure sensors inside the socket to check the fit of the liner and used motion capture technology to monitor John’s gait.Dr Elena Seminati, Lecturer in Clinical Biomechanics at the University of Bath, said: Lecturer in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dr Vimal Dhokia, said: There’s a window of around 18 months where an amputee decides whether to use prosthetics to learn to walk again or use a wheelchair. Unfortunately, this is a time the residuum changes in size and shape as part of the healing process, making it difficult to get a good fitting.Our technology will help achieve a comfortable fit for the patient and really make a difference in helping them walk again and improve their quality of life.”last_img read more

Four arrests over Taiwans first bitcoin robbery

Calls are mounting for Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to be regulated, and prices have fluctuated in recent months amid concerns over tightened control Britain urges global regulation of bitcoin Explore further Taiwan police have arrested four men over a bitcoin robbery worth Twd$5 million ($170,000) in what they said was the first case of its kind on the island. Citation: Four arrests over Taiwan’s ‘first’ bitcoin robbery (2018, February 22) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-taiwan-bitcoin-robbery.html Bitcoin is a virtual currency created from computer code that allows anonymous transactions and its value has soared since it came into being in 2009.Taiwan police said three men in their early twenties lured a man surnamed Tai to the central city of Taichung, pretending to be interested in buying bitcoins. After Tai showed proof of his bitcoins on his phone, the scammers assaulted him and his friend, then transferred 18 bitcoins worth Tw$5 million from Tai’s account via his phone. The suspects attempted to pass off the heist as a drunken row by forcing the victim to drink Kaoliang, a strong Taiwanese liquor, Taichung city police said in a statement. Police arrived at the scene after receiving a call about a dispute and one man was detained. The other two had fled. “The police saw bloodstains at the scene… after further investigation, it was discovered to be a bitcoin virtual currency robbery,” the statement released Wednesday said. It described the case, which happened earlier this month, as “the first domestic case of bitcoin robbery”. The two other suspects were later arrested, one on the outlying island of Kinmen where he had gone to escape police.The fourth man, surnamed Shih, believed to be the mastermind behind the robbery, was also detained.Britain saw its first Bitcoin armed robbery last month, according to reports, in which a virtual currency trader and his wife were threatened with a gun.Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are independent of governments and banks and use blockchain technology, where encrypted digital coins are created by supercomputers. But calls are mounting for virtual currencies to be regulated, and prices have fluctuated in recent months amid concerns over tightened control. © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

YouTube driving global consumption of music

first_imgIf you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube. Music piracy on increase worldwide: industry group A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published on Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.The report published on Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16 to 24 year olds reaching 94 percent.The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to radio.Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.”This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face -– both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music”.It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. Explore further A YouTube;s corporate headquarters in San Bruno, California on April 03, 2018. Gunshots erupted at YouTube’s offices in California Tuesday, sparking a panicked escape by employees and a massive police response, before the shooter—a woman—apparently committed suicide.Police said three people had been hospitalized with gunshot injuries following the shooting in the city of San Bruno, and that a female suspect was found dead at the scene. “We have one subject who is deceased inside the building with a self-inflicted wound,” San Bruno Police Chief Ed Barberini told reporters. “At this time, we believe it to be the shooter.”center_img Citation: YouTube driving global consumption of music (2018, October 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-youtube-global-consumption-music.html © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Future wildfires Stronger buildings could delay but not stop destruction alone

first_img Unfortunately, better building materials and planning can only offer so much protection, says a Purdue University natural hazards engineering expert.”Two possible strategies to mitigate a structure’s vulnerabilities to wildfire damage include incorporating better building materials and creating a defensible space around the structure where a fire can be stopped,” says Julio Ramirez, the center director for the National Science Foundation’s Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure Network Coordination Office, and Purdue’s Karl H. Kettelhut Professor of Civil Engineering.”But no building material is completely fireproof,” he says.The majority of Camp Fire damage was concentrated on buildings with wooden frames and flammable roof material.To delay damage, Ramirez says, the frames should be substituted with concrete reinforced by steel, and the roofs with clay tiles. The type of windows is also important, as single-pane windows are vulnerable to glass breakage due to high temperatures.A defensible space adds extra protection. Buildings in these regions should be farther apart from each other – since human activity in highly populated areas increases risk of fires – and as far away as possible from wooded areas or shrubbery.When fire reaches a reinforced concrete structure, the heat has to first cause the concrete to separate and fall off, exposing steel. Then the steel eventually melts and the structure can potentially collapse.Despite its shortcomings, reinforced concrete combined with a defensible space could still buy time for people to evacuate along identified routes.”The biggest problem with wildfires is how quickly they spread,” Ramirez says. “Even though reinforced concrete can be more expensive than wood, it’s not unreasonable for areas commonly stricken by this type of natural disaster.”Cities should also evaluate power distribution, such as risk of a transformer spark initiating a fire, and further educate residents on preventive measures in a dry environment. California’s deadly Camp Fire is now 100 percent contained, but low humidity and strong winds in the state mean that wildfires could strike again. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Even though no building material is fireproof, a few strategies could still allow more evacuation time during a future wildfire. Credit: Purdue Universitycenter_img Provided by Purdue University Citation: Future wildfires: Stronger buildings could delay, but not stop, destruction alone (2018, November 28) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-future-wildfires-stronger-destruction.html Stronger buildings could delay wildfire destruction, but not stop it, professor sayslast_img read more

Biomedical engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with childrens toy

first_imgThe paired sensors — one placed between the ninth and 10th ribs and the other on the abdomen — track the rate and volume of the wearer’s respiration by measuring the local strain on the application areas. Credit: Josh Kim / UCI The inexpensively produced sensors were created by UCI biomedical engineers using the popular children’s toy Shrinky Dinks, thin sheets of plastic that are painted or drawn on and then shrunk with heat.Placed in two positions—one between the ninth and 10th ribs and another on the abdomen—the Band-Aid-like devices track the rate and volume of the wearer’s respiration by measuring the local strain on the application areas. The information gleaned could, in the case of asthma, help warn of an oncoming attack.”The current standard of care in respiration monitoring is a pulmonary function test that’s often difficult to perform and limited in terms of the snapshot it provides of a patient’s respiratory health—meaning problems can sometimes be missed,” said Michael Chu, UCI graduate student researcher in biomedical engineering and lead author of a paper on the innovation published today in npj Digital Medicine. “Our new stretch sensors allow users to walk around and go about their lives while vital information on the health of their lungs is being collected.”The devices are made by applying a very thin layer of metal to a sheet of the plastic toy and then heat-shrinking it to cause corrugation. The film is then transferred to a soft, stretchy material—similar to small bandage—that can be adhered to a patient. Signals from embedded sensors can be transmitted via Bluetooth to be displayed on a smartphone app.Michelle Khine, UCI professor of biomedical engineering, in whose lab the devices were developed, said she was inspired to pursue the innovation after the birth of her son nine months ago. Complications required the newborn to be confined to the neonatal intensive care unit hooked up to an array of machines supplying oxygen and monitoring his breathing.”Despite having his whole tiny body covered in sensors, all the hospital staff could get was respiration rate information. If you looked at the vitals monitor, you’d see this waveform, so it looked like they were getting [respiration volume] information, but they weren’t,” Khine said. “I felt so helpless with my child just lying in this box. I wasn’t allowed to carry him for eight days, so it was heartbreaking—but also frustrating to see all of these wires hooked up to him but not giving all the information we wanted.”She said those days in the hospital following the birth of her son were strongly motivating to her as a biomedical engineer: “I sent some pictures of him all wired up to my students, and I said, ‘We have to be able to do better than this. This is 2018. It’s insane.'”Khine’s lab is well-known for employing Shrinky Dinks as a platform for medical applications. About a decade ago, she innovated the use of the toy to produce microfluidic devices.”It’s amazing that this toy for kids has enabled us to create these robust sensors that may one day benefit children and others around the world,” she said.So far, members of the Khine lab have tested the new technology on healthy subjects, but there are plans for a pilot trial with a small number of asthma sufferers in the coming months. Explore further Provided by University of California, Irvine The Shrinky Dink solution This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Michael Chu et al, Respiration rate and volume measurements using wearable strain sensors, npj Digital Medicine (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41746-019-0083-3 Citation: Biomedical engineers develop wearable respiration monitor with children’s toy (2019, February 14) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-biomedical-wearable-respiration-children-toy.html Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a wearable, disposable respiration monitor that provides high-fidelity readings on a continuous basis. It’s designed to help children with asthma and cystic fibrosis and others with chronic pulmonary conditions.last_img read more

Motorless pumps and selfregulating valves made from ultrathin film

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The valves and pumps being developed by the research group led by Professor Stefan Seelecke at Saarland University are made from electroactive silicone film and offer a lot more than just the typical ‘open/close’ or ‘on/off’ functionality. The researchers control the film electrically and can make it execute precise vibrations or pulses on demand, while also monitoring its exact position or shape. This responsiveness makes it possible to continuously vary the flow rate through a valve or continuously regulate the performance of a pump. Another feature of these film-based devices is that they can indicate if they have become blocked by a foreign body. As the researchers can shape the films to fit into almost any casing, the films can be used in a broad range of practical applications. Provided by Saarland University Citation: Motorless pumps and self-regulating valves made from ultrathin film (2019, March 22) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-motorless-self-regulating-valves-ultrathin.html Touchscreens go 3-D with buttons that pulsate and vibrate under your fingertipscenter_img The team will be at this year’s Hannover Messe, where they will be demonstrating their technology at the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand (Hall 2, Stand B46).The failure of small valves or pumps in a large industrial plant can cause major problems for the maintenance and repair teams. It can take quite a time before the faulty component has been tracked down. And this can be all the more problematic if the fault took time to make itself felt; the longer it takes to find a fault, the greater the potential damage to the plant. If, for example, a foreign body becomes trapped in a valve and the valve doesn’t close properly as a result, it can take time before operators are aware of the malfunction.Thankfully, this situation does not arise with the novel pumps and valves that have been developed by Professor Stefan Seelecke and his research team at Saarland University. ‘Our devices are able to communicate their status and their activity in real time. For instance, the valve can tell us not only whether it is open or closed, but exactly how far open it is. If it can’t close because of the presence of a foreign body, it can also communicate this fact to us,’ explains Professor Seelecke.The valves and pumps created by the Saarbrücken research group are made from a thin silicone film that is printed on both sides with an electrically conducting material. Scientists refer to these materials as dielectric elastomers. ‘If we apply a voltage to the film, it generates an electrostatic attractive force that compresses the film, causing it to expand out sideways,’ says Steffen Hau, a Ph.D. engineer working in Seelecke’s team. By altering the applied electric field in a controlled manner, the engineers can make the film undergo high-frequency vibrations or continuously variable flexing motions. Effectively, the film can adopt almost any required position or orientation. ‘These properties mean that the film can be used to design novel drive systems,’ explains Hau.Using intelligent algorithms to control the movement of the film, the researchers at Saarland University and at the Center for Mechatronics and Automation Technology (ZeMA) in Saarbrücken are developing self-regulating valves and motorless pumps. ‘We don’t need any separate moving parts for our pumps. Because the pumps can run without a rotating motor, they are flat, compact and very energy efficient,’ says Hau. ‘We can control the volume flow rate in these pumps using the amplitude of the applied voltage rather than the frequency, which is what is normally used,’ he adds. This enables very quiet pumps to be built.’As the film itself can act as a position sensor, so too can a component made from it,’ says Philipp Linnebach, a doctoral research student who is studying the new film-based drive systems. When the film distorts, an electrical capacitance value can be precisely assigned to any particular position of the film. ‘If we measure a change in capacitance, we know exactly by how much the film has distorted, explains Linnebach. This allows specific motion sequences to be calculated precisely and programmed in a control unit. The film-based valve can therefore be used to deliver exactly the required amount of compressed air or liquid.The film itself is essentially a flat structure. ‘We have now developed the technology to a point where we can produce films of the required shape. So we can now adapt the films to meet the needs of specific applications,’ says Steffen Hau. The technology is cost-effective to manufacture and the components are very lightweight. They also consume very little energy and are more than a hundred times more energy efficient than conventional components. Compared to a conventional solenoid valve, the film-based valve consumes up to 400 times less energy. Explore further Engineers Philipp Linnebach (left) and Steffen Hau (right) from the research team led by Professor Stefan Seelecke with prototypes of a motorless pump (center) and a smart valve (front right) made from electroactive polymer film. Credit: Oliver Dietzelast_img read more

Kulbhushan Jadhavs execution put on hold India granted consular access by ICJ

first_img Next Kulbhushan Jadhav’s execution put on hold, India granted consular access by ICJ: 10 pointsRejecting all the objections raised by Pakistan, The Hague-based ICJ also directed the country to grant consular or diplomatic access to Kulbhushan Jadhav “without further delay” in accordance with the Geneva Convention.advertisement India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 17, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 23:29 IST The ICJ said that it was satisfied on the nationality of Kulbhushan Jadhav and that the fact had been acknowledged by both Pakistan and India. (Photo: PTI)HIGHLIGHTSICJ called for an effective review and reconsideration of the conviction of Kulbhushan JadhavICJ observed Pakistan had “breached” the convention by denying Jadhav his rightsThe ICJ ordered “a continued stay of execution” on Kulbhushan JadhavIn a major win for India, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on Wednesday continued its stay on the death sentence awarded to Kulbhushan Jadhav on the charges of “espionage and terrorism” by a Pakistani military court. A bench led by President of the Court Judge Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf also called for an effective review and reconsideration of the conviction of Kulbhushan Jadhav, held in a Pakistani jail since 2016.Rejecting all the objections raised by Pakistan, The Hague-based world court also directed the country to grant consular or diplomatic access to Kulbhushan Jadhav “without further delay” in accordance with the Geneva Convention, observing that it had “breached” the convention by denying the Indian national his right.KULBHUSHAN JADHAV VERDICT IN 10 POINTS1. While pronouncing the ruling, the ICJ observed that Pakistan had deprived India of the right to communicate with and have access to Kulbhushan Jadhav or to arrange for his legal representation.2. The court said Pakistan is “under an obligation” to inform Jadhav “without further delay of his rights and to provide Indian consular officers access to him” in accordance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.3. In its ruling by 15-1, the ICJ ordered “a continued stay of execution” on Jadhav, saying it “constitutes an indispensable condition for the effective review and reconsideration of the conviction and sentence” of the accused.4. The ICJ also said that it was satisfied that Kulbhushan Jadhav was an Indian national and that the fact had been acknowledged by both Pakistan and India.5. In 2017, while moving the ICJ, India had rubbished Pakistan’s claim that Kulbhushan Jadhav was a “spy” and sought immediate annulment of his death sentence. The world court, however, said that “it is not to be presumed that partial and total annulment of the conviction or sentence provides the necessary and sole remedy in cases of violations of the Vienna Conventionthus, the court finds that these submissions made by India cannot be upheld”.6. Prime Minister Narendra Modi welcomed the decision and congratulated the ICJ for its verdict based on an extensive study of facts. “We welcome today’s verdict in the @CIJ_ICJ. Truth and justice have prevailed. Congratulations to the ICJ for a verdict based on extensive study of facts. I am sure Kulbhushan Jadhav will get justice. Our Government will always work for the safety and welfare of every Indian,” PM Narendra Modi said.We welcome today’s verdict in the @CIJ_ICJ. Truth and justice have prevailed. Congratulations to the ICJ for a verdict based on extensive study of facts. I am sure Kulbhushan Jadhav will get justice.Our Government will always work for the safety and welfare of every Indian. Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) July 17, 20197. Former External Affairs Minister (EAM) Sushma Swaraj, Congress leader P Chidambaram, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, Union Defence Minister Rajnath Singh, Union Minister Nitin Gadkari, former cricketer Virender Sehwag among others, too, welcomed the ICJ ruling.8. The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) also welcomed the ruling in the favour of India and said that the ICJ has “upheld India’s claim that Pakistan is in egregious violation of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations on several counts”. India has urged Pakistan to immediately provide consular access to Jadhav, as per the court’s directive.9. Reacting to the developments at the ICJ, India’s advocate in Kulbhushan Jadhav case, Harish Salve, said that it won’t be a fair trial if the case is back in the military court with the same rules “where outside lawyers aren’t allowed”. “Access isn’t given, evidence isn’t given. It won’t meet standards,” he said.”We expect Pakistan to do whatever it has to do including appropriate legislative measures to guarantee a fair trial. So Pakistan’s conduct is under watch and if what they do is another farcical attempt, we will be back in the Court,” Harish Salve said.#WATCH Harish Salve: I’ve a degree of personal satisfaction that a lot of adjectives were used by Pakistan, even in replying at court I characterise them as unfortunate. I said it’s my upbringing & India’s tradition which stood in my way of replying to them in that language. #ICJ pic.twitter.com/eKWXJiEnBz ANI (@ANI) July 17, 201910. Reacting to the verdict on the Kulbhushan Jadhav case, Pakistan on Wednesday said it will now proceed “as per law”. Pakistan’s foreign office, in a statement, said Pakistan as a “responsible member” of the international community “upheld its commitment” by appearing before the court for the provisional measures hearing despite very short notice. “Having heard the judgment, Pakistan will now proceed as per law,” the statement read.Kulbhushan Jadhav was allegedly “arrested” from Balochistan by Pakistani security forces on March 3, 2016. Pakistan has claimed that Kulbhushan Jadhav was arrested after he entered the country from Iran. India has, however, rejected Pakistan’s claims and has always maintained that Kulbhushan Jadhav was kidnapped when he was in Iran on a business trip.Also Read | Pakistan also claims victory in Kulbhushan Jadhav case, Imran Khan govt says big winAlso Read | Pakistan bound to give fair trial to Kulbhushan Jadhav even in military court: Harish Salve after ICJ rulingAlso Watch | ICJ stays Kulbhushan Jadhav’s execution, asks Pakistan to provide consular accessFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhanlast_img read more

BJP TMC clash in Bengals Bongaon over noconfidence motion in civic body

first_img Press Trust of India Bongaon (WB)July 16, 2019UPDATED: July 16, 2019 19:30 IST Members of the ruling Trinamool Congress and the BJP clashed in Bongaon in North 24 Parganas district of West Bengal on Tuesday over a no-confidence motion in the civic body, police said.There were, however, no immediate reports of any injury or arrest in the incident.Police said bombs were hurled during the clash which took place in front of the Bongaon Municipality office.Following the incident, prohibitory order under Section 144 of the CrPC was clamped and rapid action force personnel were deployed, police said.Patrolling by security forces is on in the area.ALSO READ | Fresh violence in Bengal’s Bhatpara-Kankinara as miscreants ransack maternity home, hurl bombsALSO WATCH | BJP, TMC workers clash in Bengal’s North 24 Parganas districtFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnupriya Thakur Tags :Follow BengalFollow West BengalFollow Trinamool Congress BJP, TMC clash in Bengal’s Bongaon over no-confidence motion in civic bodyMembers of the ruling Trinamool Congress and the BJP clashed in Bongaon in North 24 Parganas district of West Bengal on Tuesday over a no-confidence motion in the civic body, police said.advertisement Nextlast_img read more

Remains of Napoleons OneLegged General Found Under Russian Dance Floor

first_img Originally published on Live Science. An excavation in a peculiar place — under the foundation of a dance floor in Russia — has uncovered the remains of one of Napoleon Bonaparte’s favorite generals: a one-legged man who was killed by a cannonball more than 200 years ago, news sources report. Gen. Charles Etienne Gudin fought with Napoleon during the failed French invasion of Russia in 1812. On July 6 of this year, an international team of French and Russian archaeologists discovered what are believed to be his remains, in Smolensk, a city about 250 miles (400 kilometers) west of Moscow, according to Reuters.These Sharks Were Too Busy to Notice a Bigger Predator Watching ThemThe unexpected twist at the end of this feeding frenzy delighted scientists.Credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65920-napoleon-general-found-in-russia.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2802:28  After his death at age 44 on Aug. 22, 1812, Gudin got star treatment. His name was inscribed on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, his bust was placed at the Palace of Versailles, a Paris street was named after him and, as a sentimental gesture, his heart was removed from his body and placed in a chapel at the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. [Photos: Archaeologists Excavate Battlefield from Napoleonic Wars] The researchers said that several clues suggested that the skeleton they found under the dance floor belongs to Gudin, who had known Napoleon since childhood. Both men attended the Military School in Brienne, in France’s Champagne region. Upon hearing of Gudin’s death, Napoleon reportedly cried and ordered that his friend’s name be engraved on the Arc de Triomphe, according to Euronews. Photos: Mass Graves Hold 17th-Century Prisoners of War 19 of the World’s Oldest Photos Reveal a Rare Side of History Photos: A 400-Year-Old War Grave Revealed Records from the 1812 Russian invasion note that Gudin’s battlefield injuries required him to have his left leg amputated below the knee, Euronews reported. Indeed, the skeleton in the coffin was missing its left leg and showed evidence of injury to the right leg — details that were also mentioned in those records, the archaeologists said, according to Reuters. Moreover, it was “with a high degree of probability” that the remains the team uncovered belonged to an aristocrat and a military veteran of both the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, they said, according to Reuters. “It’s a historic moment not only for me, but for I think for our two countries,” French historian and archaeologist Pierre Malinovsky, who helped find the remains, told the Smolensk newspaper Rabochiy Put (Worker’s Journey), according to Reuters. “Napoleon was one of the last people to see him alive, which is very important, and he’s the first general from the Napoleonic period that we have found.” The general has known living descendants, so researchers plan to test the skeleton for DNA. That way, they’ll be able to say for sure whether the remains are those of Gudin. Gudin, however, is hardly the only French fatality recently found in Russia. Earlier this year, scientists did a virtual facial reconstruction of a man in his 20s who was slashed in the face with a saber and died during the invasion of Russia. A portrait of Charles Etienne Gudin, who fought in Napoleon’s Grande Armée. Credit: Photo12/UIG/Getty Images last_img read more

A Pair of Shipwrecked WWIIEra Submarines Just Vanished from the Sea Near

first_imgMore than 100 World War II-era shipwrecks decorate the seafloor around Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore — and now, there are two fewer. According to Dutch media reports, a pair of submarines that sank off the coast of Malaysia in 1941 mysteriously vanished late last week, leaving behind only some broken scraps and ghostly outlines in the sand. The wrecked subs — Dutch vessels named HNLMS O 16 and HNLMS K XVII — also contained the remains of 79 crewmen, which are now missing. [17 Mysterious Shipwrecks You Can See on Google Earth] How does a shipwreck simply disappear? According to Dutch government officials, the subs were likely stolen by scrap-metal scavengers, who have made a habit of pilfering old wrecks from the region. As many as 40 World War II-era ships have been partially or completely dismantled by scavengers, a 2017 report by the Guardian found, resulting in the desecration of the remains of some 4,500 crewmen who went down with their ships.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65894-dutch-wwii-era-submarines-vanished.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Salvaging a shipwreck usually requires blowing the vessel apart with explosives, then spending days or weeks hauling any valuable metals up onto the surface with a crane. For their trouble, scavengers can come away with millions of dollars’ worth of steel per ransacked ship, plus other spoils, such as copper cables and phosphor bronze propellers, according to the Guardian article. Wartime shipwrecks are protected under international treaties as the unmarked graves of departed soldiers — however, that has not stopped salvagers from destroying the wrecks of the American, British, Dutch, English, Australian and Japanese vessels resting in South East Asian waters. In March 2018, Malaysian officials signed an agreement with the Dutch foreign minister to better protect Dutch war wrecks in Malaysia’s waters. (Parts of Malaysia were once under Dutch colonial rule.) The agreement followed a string of particularly serious shipwreck desecrations; in 2016, the wrecks of three Dutch warships vanished from the bottom of the Java Sea off the coast of Indonesia, along with the remains of 2,200 people, the Guardian reported. In Photos: Diving for a Famed Roman Shipwreck Disasters at Sea: 6 Deadliest Shipwrecks Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Shipwrecks Gallery: Secrets of the Deeplast_img read more

No Signs of Aliens in the Closest 1300 Stars Hunt Funded by

first_img 11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxy While the truth might be out there, technological aliens don’t seem to be — at least not yet. New results from the most comprehensive Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) program ever undertaken — which surveyed 1,327 nearby stars for signals from intelligent beings — have turned up empty. “There’s certainly nothing out there glaringly obvious,” Danny Price, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley, and lead author of a paper about the results, which were published in The Astrophysical Journal, told Live Science. “There’s no amazingly advanced civilizations trying to contact us with incredibly powerful transmitters.” While the team didn’t find anything this time around, Price said that there could be many explanations for the lack of alien signals. Perhaps the search was conducted at the wrong frequencies, or those signals were hidden by radio interference from Earth. Any such undertaking is limited by the methods and discoveries that humans happen to have made in the course of our own history. [9 Strange, Scientific Excuses for Why Humans Haven’t Found Aliens Yet]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65745-extraterrestrial-intelligence-has-not-phoned-home.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “In a lot of ways, SETI is a bit of a mirror back on ourselves and our own technology and our understanding of physics,” Price said. The search was conducted as part of the Breakthrough Listen initiative, a 10-year, $100-million endeavor funded by Russian billionaire Yuri Milner that aims to scan the skies for technosignatures: transmissions or other evidence created by technological creatures on other worlds. The initiative, which kicked off in 2015, relies on two of the world’s most powerful telescopes — the 328-foot-diameter (100 meters) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, and the 210-foot-diameter (64 m) Parkes Telescope in New South Wales, Australia — to try to eavesdrop on alien communications. In their latest data release, researchers analyzed 1 petabyte (or 1 million gigabytes) of data in both radio and optical wavelengths, looking at more than a thousand stars within 160 light-years of Earth. Several thousand interesting signals appeared during the search, though all turned out to originate from mundane sources, like human-made satellites. The entire gargantuan information catalog will be publicly available on Breakthrough’s Open Data Archive, making it the largest publication of SETI data in the history of the field. Jason Wright, an astrophysicist at Pennsylvania State University who was not involved in the work, told Live Science he was impressed with the researchers’ commitment to public release of their data. “Anyone who thinks the team might have missed something can go over their results and see for themselves,” he said.  Wright has previously calculated that all SETI searches conducted to date amount to combing through the equivalent of a little more than a hot tub’s worth of water in all of our planet’s oceans. The latest addition increases that by 50% in radio wavelengths, he said, or roughly another bathtub’s worth. Price was optimistic that in the future his team will be able to put more stringent limits on the prevalence of life in the universe. The researchers intend to use the upcoming MeerKAT telescope in South Africa, an observatory that will consist of 64 separate 44-foot-diameter (13.5 m) arrays, to search more than a million stars in our galactic neighborhood for extraterrestrial transmissions. While any signal that appeared would have to be carefully scrutinized to ensure it was genuine, Price said such a finding would be truly revolutionary. “I think it would be one of the most important discoveries humankind would ever make,” he said. 10 Interesting Places in the Solar System We’d Like to Visit Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndo 15 Amazing Images of Starslast_img read more

ED questions P Chidambaram in INX Media PMLA case

first_imgeconomic offence COMMENT The alleged irregularities took place in FIPB clearance to INX Media for receiving Rs 305 crore overseas funds in 2007 Former Union minister P Chidambaram was on Wednesday questioned by the Enforcement Directorate (ED) in connection with the INX Media money laundering case, official sources said. He arrived at the agency’s office in Jamnagar House, near India Gate, at around 11:15 am along with his lawyer.This is the first time that the 73-year-old former finance and home minister is being grilled by the ED in this case.Sources said the senior Congress leader was asked to depose before the investigating officer (IO) of the case to record his statement under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA) and was given a time for Wednesday.It has earlier questioned him in the Aircel-Maxis PMLA case.The Delhi High Court, last month, had extended till January 15 the interim protection from arrest granted to Chidambaram on his pleas seeking anticipatory bail in the INX Media case lodged by both the ED and the CBI.The court had also directed him to cooperate with the investigation.The central probe agency has questioned Chidambaram’s son Karti Chidambaram in the INX Media case in the past and has also attached his assets worth an estimated Rs 54 crore, located in India and abroad.Also read: ED attaches Karti Chidambaram’s assets worth Rs 54 cr in India, abroadThe ED had registered a PMLA case in this deal case on the basis of a CBI FIR and had alleged that irregularities took place in the FIPB clearance to INX Media for receiving overseas funds to the tune of Rs 305 crore in 2007 when P Chidambaram was the Union finance minister.It had registered an Enforcement Case Information Report (ECIR), the ED’s equivalent of a police FIR, against the accused named in a CBI complaint, including Karti Chidambaram, INX Media and its directors Peter and Indrani Mukerjea.Karti Chidambaram was also arrested on February 28 by the CBI for allegedly taking money to facilitate the FIPB clearance to INX Media in 2007. He was later granted bail.   P Chidambaram, Congress leader. File photo SHARE SHARE EMAIL Published oncenter_img COMMENTS December 19, 2018 corruption & bribery SHARElast_img read more

Rahul Gandhi granted bail in Ahmedabad bank defamation case on Rs 15000

first_img India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 17:43 IST Rahul Gandhi comes out of the court after the defamation case hearing. (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSRahul Gandhi has been granted bail on a bond of Rs 15,000Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank had filed a criminal defamation suit against GandhiAmit Shah is one of the directors of the cooperative bankRahul Gandhi has been granted bail in the criminal defamation suit filed against him by Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank and its chairman Ajay Patel.During the hearing, when the metropolitan court judge asked him if he accepts his crime, Rahul Gandhi said, “I am not a criminal.”Rahul Gandhi was present for the defamation case hearing at the Ahmedabad Metropolitan Court.The court granted Rahul Gandhi bail on a bond of Rs 15,000.The defamation suit was filed last year after Gandhi and Congress spokesperson Randeep Singh Surjewala claimed that the Ahmedabad District Cooperative Bank was involved in a “scam” to swap Rs 745.59 crore in swapped notes with valid currency within five days of demonetisation announcement on November 8, 2016.Union home minister Amit Shah is one of the directors of the ADC Bank.The court issued summonses to the two leaders on April 9 after finding prima facie evidence against them.The complainants said that the Congress leaders levelled “false and defamatory allegations” against the bank.The court had conducted an inquiry under section 202 of the Code of Criminal Procedure before summoning Gandhi and Surjewala.The section deals with inquiry to decide whether there is sufficient ground for proceeding against a person.Gandhi and Surjewala’s allegations were based on the reply given by the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development to an RTI query of a Mumbai-based activist.ADCB and Patel have denied that the bank exchanged such a huge amount of swapped currency as alleged.(With PTI inputs)Also Read | Have not demanded front-row seat for Rahul Gandhi in Parliament: CongressAlso Watch | Is Rahul Gandhi’s strategy now to demonise RSS and play martyr?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanchari Chatterjee Next Rahul Gandhi granted bail in Ahmedabad bank defamation case on Rs 15,000 bondRahul Gandhi has been granted bail in the criminal defamation case filed by an Ahmedabad bank.advertisementlast_img read more