POLICE LOG for July 10 Truck Broken Into Ring Lost At Soccer

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Tuesday, July 10, 2018:A Lockwood Road caller reported a tractor trailer pulled wires off of her house. Police notified Verizon. (7:48am)A 1-vehicle crash occurred on West Street involving an entrapment. Woburn Street at West Street was temporarily closed. No injuries noted. Vehicle towed. Landscaping damage down to home on West Street. (8:45am)Inbound train blocking Middlesex Avenue/Route 62 at North Wilmington station. (12:36pm)A walk-in party reported his truck was broken into sometime between June 24 and July 8 on Nassau Avenue. (1:49pm)Fire Department responded to a mulch fire at Market Basket on Main Street. (2:42pm)Police requested MassDOT be notified regarding lines on Main Street, near Wilmington Builders Supply. When road is wet, lines can’t be seen, causing traffic to drive on travel into wrong side of road. (9:39pm)A caller reported about 5 juveniles on the Yentile Farm soccer field with flashlights. Police responded. It was a group of adults on the field looking for a ring that was lost on the field during the evening game. The ring was silver with indents and symbols. (10:17pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 16: Man Pulled Over For Riding Lawn Mower Down Richmond St.; Grandchild Scam ReportedIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 2: Vehicle Damages Roadway; Police Called Over Suspicious BehaviorIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 5: Driver Throws Beer Bottles; Syringe Found; Woburn Man Issued Summons; Texting While DrivingIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Digital Security Bill passed to gag media hide corruption BNP

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviBranding the Digital Security Bill 2018’ as an ‘evil spirit of Baksal’, BNP on Thursday alleged that the government has enacted the law to hide its ‘massive corruption’ and gag the media and people’s voice, reports UNB.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, party senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi also called upon the people, journalists and those who believe in free-thinking to put up a resistance against it.”The controversial Digital Security Bill was passed in parliament yesterday (Wednesday) to gag the media and shut the mouths of people of Bangladesh. This law is an evil spirit of Baksal,” he said. The BNP leader further said, “This black law was formulated to conceal the corruption of the government’s lakhs of crore taka.” He said the law was also made so that no mass media or any other platform can publish any report on the government’s corruption. ”People’s freedom of speech and their individual overall freedom have been snatched through the black law,” he observed. Rizvi also alleged the law will contribute to rise in the offences like corruption and human rights violation. “The articles 8, 21, 25, 28, 29, 31, 32 and 43 of the black law are unconstitutional.” ”The constitution’s main spirit, especially the rights of free thinking, freedom of expression, and the freedom of press, have been snatched through the law,” he noted. The BNP leader also said the Digital Security Bill has put people’s security under a threat as law enforcers now will be able to raid media outlets, seize computers and other equipment and arrest anyone without any warrant.  He feared that common people will also be affected by the law.last_img read more

Rajshahi woman slaughtered

first_imgA woman was slaughtered by miscreants at Jitpur in Tanore, Rajshahi on Wednesday night. The deceased is Zohara Begum, 50, reports UNB. After separation with her husband Helal Uddin, she used to stay with her son Jahangir Alam at the village.Quoting locals, police said a group of miscreants stormed the house of Jahangir around 9:00pm and swooped on his wife Rumi Khatun with sharp weapons.As Zohara came in the rescue of Rumi, the attackers slit her throat, leaving her dead on the spot.Locals took injured Rumi to Tanore Upazila Health Complex.Officer-in-charge of Tanore police station Rezaul Islam said they were trying to arrest the culprits.last_img

Gopalganj bus plunge kills 2

first_imgA bank official and a woman were killed and 20 others injured after a bus plunged into a roadside ditch in Sadar upazila of Gopalganj on Tuesday morning, reports UNB.The deceased are Nurul Islam, 40, son of late Abdul Mazed Mollah, resident of Sultanshahi village. He was the senior officer (cash) of BASIC Bank. The other victim is Momena Begum, 25, daughter of Shahid Mollah, and a resident of Purbapara village in Kotalipara upazila.Police said the accident took place around 9:30am on the Gopalganj-Kotalipara road in Khanarpara.”The bus fell into a roadside ditch, killing two persons on the spot,” said Sirajul Islam, sub-inspector of Sadar police station.The injured were admitted to Gopalganj General Hospital.last_img

Photon funnel could direct and regulate light into solar cells

first_img Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society It has often been said that solar cells are like artificial versions of the photosynthetic apparatuses found in plants, such as leaves, since both harvest sunlight. But nature’s leaves can do something that most solar cells cannot do: protect themselves against photochemical damage from overexposure to sunlight. Illustration of the light-harvesting funnel array that directs energy to a focal point along diverse routes, and then slowly off-loads the energy to a solar cell or other device. Credit: Raymond Ziessel, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society More information: Raymond Ziessel, et al. “An Artificial Light-Harvesting Array Constructed from Multiple Bodipy Dyes.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI: 10.1021/ja4049306 Researchers recreate photosynthesis to power devices © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved.center_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Photon funnel could direct and regulate light into solar cells (2013, July 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-photon-funnel-solar-cells.html In an attempt to protect artificial light-harvesting devices from sun damage, chemists have designed a funnel-shaped molecular-scale array that harvests photons, spreads the energy around the array, and off-loads the energy at a relatively slow rate to a solar cell or other device. By regulating the amount of energy that enters the solar cell, the new array could extend the lifetime of the solar cell, which must function in harsh conditions associated with prolonged exposure to sunlight.The researchers, Raymond Ziessel, Gilles Ulrich, and Alexandre Haefele at the University of Strasbourg in France, along with Anthony Harriman at Newcastle University in the UK, have published their paper on their artificial light-harvesting array in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.”UV light is harmful to the cells and to the supporting structure,” Harriman told Phys.org. “Photons are lost by way of annihilation, and optimal performance requires a steady flux of photons. This is even more important for water-splitting devices, which is where we see our light harvester having real applications.”The new array consists of 21 Bodipy (“boron-dipyrromethene”) dyes, which are highly fluorescent dyes known for their good light absorption and emission. The Bodipy dyes are arranged in a funnel-like design that converges onto a focal point. When exposed to light, the array guides the excitation energy from incident photons through the funnel through a series of cascading energy transfer steps until the energy reaches the focal point. The most important feature of the design is its ability to self-regulate its energy. When the focal point is in an excited state, further energy transfer to the focal point is restricted. In order to increase the amount of energy that reaches the focal point, the topology of the array provides diverse travel routes for the energy to ensure different arrival times. The strategy involves redistributing excess energy within the array until the focal point is no longer “saturated.” This mechanism for protecting against overexposure to sunlight is not strictly based on the mechanisms used by plants. In nature, various different mechanisms have evolved for this purpose, although the details of these mechanisms are still under active debate.While the properties of the new array are intriguing, the scientists add that the actual synthesis is also state-of-the-art. Using Bodipy dyes as building blocks allows certainty about the emergent structure, unlike when using other molecules, such as dendrimers, where it is difficult to assure complete growth with each layer. In the future, the molecular-scale funnel could protect solar cells by functioning as a sensitizer; that is, transferring energy in a controlled way to the solar cells or other external devices. The array also provides a benefit in stability compared with using a mixture of compounds. And although the array restricts energy transfer, it does not decrease solar cell efficiency.”At present, the limiting efficiency is coupling together the two systems,” Harriman said. “In principle, there should be no decrease in efficiency. The real advantage will come from using a large-area collector and a small-area solar cell.”In the future, the researchers plan to improve the transfer of photons from the array to the solar cell.”We are trying to build systems where the photons move easily from cluster to cluster before being trapped by the solar cell,” Harriman said. “Also, we are looking into ways to push the photons towards the solar cell, rather than rely on random migrations. This kind of quantum coherence might be important in certain cases in nature but is way beyond the current capability of artificial systems. We have ideas on how to improve and we foresee rapid progress in this field.”last_img read more