Corcoran: Game schedules cater to network interests, not fans’ convenience

first_imgThe Wisconsin softball team played two of its biggest home games Wednesday afternoon at Goodman Diamond, but you most likely didn’t know about them.Even if you did know the Badgers played, there’s little to no chance you could have attended the games anyway.Like half of Wisconsin’s six home series, the final home series against Nebraska yesterday came as part of a Wednesday afternoon doubleheader. The games were initially scheduled back to back at 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., but due to weather concerns, the twin bill got pushed ahead to 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. If they weren’t early enough as it was, the nearly morning start time for the first game of the doubleheader made it seem like the series was being played as part of a secret society event no one could know about. The attendance of 271 certainly reflected that, a drop of exactly 1,100 fans from last Saturday’s Senior Day matchup with Purdue.With no baseball team, softball is the calling card for the UW Athletic Department in the springtime, but you wouldn’t know that from the games scheduling. The Badgers had three home Wednesday doubleheaders this season, all with 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. start times. The other nine home games of the season consisted of two Friday doubleheaders with 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. first pitches and five Saturday and Sunday games, all of which started between the hours of 12 and 2 p.m.The times for the weekend contests are reasonable, but as for the weekday games, they leave you scratching your head. Obviously there is the subject of weather, considering spring in Wisconsin is anything but predictable. Scheduling in the afternoon helps to avoid a temperature drop come nighttime. Therefore, changing the times for the weekday games, at least in Wisconsin, might be unavoidable. But if that’s the case, then the promotion for UW student day shouldn’t have been scheduled for Wednesday afternoon’s games. The Athletic Department might not have complete control over when games are, but having a promotion during the middle of when most students are either in class or napping doesn’t bode too well. I can’t imagine that many of the 271 in attendance Wednesday were students, outside of the players on both teams who had to be there.Clearly softball isn’t one of the revenue sports at Wisconsin, but providing a quality playing environment that more closely resembles a sporting event and not the atmosphere of Steenbock Library starts with the scheduling of events.Unfortunately, though, softball isn’t the only team at Wisconsin playing during odd times of the day, and the real problem is not weather. It’s the influence of television, specifically the Big Ten Network. Ever since BTN launched in August 2007, the network has changed the sports landscape in the conference, but hardly for the better. Sure, the access to Big Ten sports has widely increased and you can now watch sports like softball, swimming and wrestling on a regular basis — if you have cable or satellite, that is — but the network has also drastically changed sports and the times they air.The biggest impact of BTN has been its at least partial responsibility for the hockey realignment, which in only one season has diluted the college hockey product. With no Big Ten hockey league when the network came on the air, it couldn’t dedicate coverage to a product on the ice and would just air games sparingly. But the discussion of an NCAA-sanctioned men’s hockey team at Penn State in 2010 allowed for a Big Ten hockey league now that there were enough teams for a league.The decision by Penn State could have been for competitive reasons, but there’s no doubt money played a key role. A network dedicated the conference gave the opportunity for teams to have regular air time and exposure, an opportunity less well known hockey schools like Ohio State, Michigan State and certainly Penn State would seize in a heartbeat. Because broadcast rights involve money, there’s more than just the idea of exposure at play.This past season with the launch of BTN hockey, ESPN U and NBC Sports also decided they wanted in on college hockey. While Wisconsin and the other Big Ten schools got more exposure because of the different television outlets, it came at a cost. For the years I have followed Wisconsin hockey dating back to the start of the Mike Eaves era in 2002; the staple start time for games was 7:07 p.m. With the influx of television deals this season though, Wisconsin started games at 4 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., which included a Thursday-Friday series in the most important two-game set of the year against then-No. 1 Minnesota. But even when games were on TV, more often than viewers would have liked, other games beforehand cut into the Badgers’ game.This has also been a regular occurrence for basketball, where games on BTN and other networks are scheduled for an unrealistic two hours to maximize the number of games in one night. Just like hockey, the games almost always seem to cut into one another. It might be a minor annoyance, but if these networks dictate when these games are played the least they could do is make sure the game gets broadcasted in its entirety.To say the softball games Wednesday were infected by this recent plague might be a bit of a stretch, but lately games have been dictated more and more by the people who stand to make money off them rather than the people who pay the money to get into them.The schools and networks can continue to schedule games however they please, but they’re only hurting themselves.Dan is currently a sophomore at UW with an undeclared major. Do you agree with him that TV networks have altered the landscape of college sports for the worse? Let him know by sending him an email at dcorcoran@badgerherald.com or sending him a tweet @DanCoco7.last_img read more

Betty Cornett, 72, Wellington: Jan. 1, 1943 – Nov. 13, 2015

first_imgBetty CornettBetty Cornett died on Friday, November 13, 2015 at Sumner Regional Medical Center in Wellington at the age of 72.Betty was born the daughter of John and Lois (Annen) Green on Friday, January 01, 1943 in Topeka.Many will remember Betty from her 30+ year career at Burlington Northern Sante Fe where she was one of just a few female trainmasters.Survivors include her son, Chris Cornett and his wife Michelle; granddaughters: Grace and Audrey Cornett all of Pryor, Oklahoma; sister, Luann Myers and her husband John of Wellington; niece, Lori Dow of Las Vegas, Nevada; niece, Jami Erbert and her husband Doug of Omaha, Nebraska; great-nephews: Collin Dow, Logan Dow, Taylor Dow; great-niece, Emily Erbert; great-nephew, Nick Erbert and cousins: Marie Alkire and her husband Mern of Mesa, Arizona and Margaret Murdock of Topeka. She was preceded in death by her parents and her aunt and uncle, Louise and Bob Thompson.The family will receive friends from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Friday evening, November 20, 2015 with Recitation of the Holy Rosary to begin at 7:00 p.m., Friday, November, 20, 2015 both in the chapel of the funeral home. Funeral Mass will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, November 21, 2015 at St. Anthony/St. Rose Catholic Church, Wellington.Interment will follow at Prairie Lawn Cemetery, Wellington.Memorial Funds have been established in her loving memory to the Mission Thrift Shop or Wellington Humane Society. Contributions may be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.cornejodayfuneralhome.com.Arrangements are by Cornejo|Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

Red Bank Declares State of Local Disaster Emergency

first_imgAs part of the state’s coordinated response to address the novel coronavirus outbreak, Governor Phil Murphy declared a State of Emergency and a Public Health Emergency, effective March 9, 2020 to ramp up New Jersey’s efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19.  The Borough of Red Bank Mayor & Council, Administration, Office of Emergency Management, Police Department and Fire Department continue to monitor the developing situation involving presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 in Monmouth County.  As of March 15, 2020, the Borough of Red Bank is not aware of any presumptive or confirmed positive cases of the COVID-19 virus in Red Bank.  For more information, visit the New Jersey COVID-19 Dashboard. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the respiratory illness caused by a new virus that first emerged in December 2019.  The NJ Department of Health (NJDOH) is leading the state’s response to COVID-19 and is working closely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For up-to-date information and recommendations, please visit the NJDOH coronavirus webpage and the CDC coronavirus webpage. Violators may be subject to fines and penalties.  It is incumbent upon all of us to aggressively mitigate the potential for exposure and further spread. All non-essential places of business with occupancy greater than 25 persons are closed to the public effective March 16, 2020 at 11:59 p.m.  This shall include restaurants, liquor establishments, private gyms, theaters, etc.All bars and restaurant establishments, with and without a liquor license, are no longer permitted to serve patrons within the establishment.  Any bar or restaurant establishment that currently offers food service will be permitted to conduct food takeout and food delivery service only.All establishments with a liquor license will no longer be permitted to sell, dispense, or distribute alcoholic beverages effective March 16, 2020 at 11:59 p.m.center_img The following is a message posted to the Red Bank government website Sunday, March 15: Effective March 15, 2020, the Borough of Red Bank’s Emergency Management Coordinator has declared a State of Local Disaster Emergency within the Borough of Red Bank.  Due to an increase of positive COVID-19 cases throughout Monmouth County and New Jersey, it is appropriate and necessary for the Borough of Red Bank to continue being proactive and a leader in its approach to advance social distancing, including preventing large gatherings in the Borough.  The health and safety of our community must be our number one priority. We apologize for any inconvenience but the safety of our business community and the public is our main concern.  We appreciate your advance cooperation and understanding during this difficult time.  The Borough encourages businesses to be proactive and follow the guidelines of the U.S. CDC. last_img read more