1XBET links up with Nigerian Football Federation

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 1XBET links up with Nigerian Football Federation 24th May 2018 | By contenteditor Tags: Online Gambling Marketing & affiliates Online betting company 1XBET has entered into a partnership with the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF). Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but it was confirmed that 1XBET will have access to various branding and advertising opportunities at Nigerian national team matches and other events run by the NFF. 1XBET will also work with the Nigeria Professional Football League (NPFL) and receive coverage across both the NFF’s and NPFL’s official websites and digital platforms. In addition, 1XBET will support the ongoing development of football in Nigeria by working with the NFF and NPFL on various initiatives. This will include funding a subscription to Instal, a match analysis software that the NFF and NPFL can use for the technical development and scouting of players. Eugene Kiryukhin, director for development (international partners) at 1XBET, said: “Our objective and strategy has always been driven by the need to stand out from other brands and offer unique and perfect user-experience. “We see Nigeria as an emerging marketing with huge potential, and the partnerships with NFF and NPFL offer us the opportunity to deepen our brand while supporting football development.”Related article: Scout pens fantasy sports deal with 1XBet AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Regions: Africa Western Africa Nigeria Online betting company 1XBET has entered into a partnership with the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) Email Addresslast_img read more

Manias and bubbles: putting cryptocurrency into context

first_imgBroadly, you could say the crypto gambling scene is healthy and growing steadily. Obviously it’s tiny compared with the fiat operators, but you don’t see a clear correlation between the descending price of Bitcoin and interest in crypto gambling.Just like the internet, I believe cryptocurrency is here to stay. It’s had its shakedown and now it’s quietly creating a revolution that will affect everybody in the most unpredictable ways in the future.Nick Garner is founder of Oshi Bitcoin casino on the Bgaming platform. Previously he was a marketing manager at Betfair (Paddy Power Betfair) and a senior marketing manager at Unibet (Kindred). Manias and bubbles: putting cryptocurrency into context Nick Garner says the recent volatility in cryptocurrency prices was not the beginning of the end but rather the start of a period of consolidation.What do Bitcoins, the internet and tulips have in common? They all triggered speculative bubbles.The Dutch tulip mania came to an end in February 1637 but at its height, some of the rarer tulip varieties were sold for more than 10 times the annual income of a skilled crafts worker. If we equate that to a skilled worker today, that’s £400,000 for a single tulip bulb!Talking of bubbles… in 1998 one could have been forgiven for thinking the internet was just for watching porn, buying drugs and early forms of gambling.However, by the late 90s, it was clear the internet was here to stay and couldn’t be destroyed by any single entity. That’s when the dotcom bubble began.As I see it, there was fundamental utility with the internet but the speculators who got involved didn’t know what to put their money into. These investors poured cash into companies such as Webvan & Boo.com. There was a collapse and vast fortunes were lost. Thus followed consolidation and steady growth ever since.What about Cryptocurrency? I set up Oshi.io, my crypto casino, because I saw the beginnings of a huge change that is going to affect all of our futures and that change driver is blockchain. Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin is just one manifestation of blockchain.Cryptocurrency doesn’t belong to any one person. It’s open source and therefore in a sense it belongs to everyone. It’s easy to trust cryptocurrency because it’s founded on blockchain with its open ledger technology over which no single entity has control.Cryptocurrency is not regulated by governments, its price is the market price and it has rarity and trust, thus determining the value.In the following chart I have superimposed the BTC/USD exchange rate since 2013 (orange) over the Nasdaq index over all time (blue).There are uncanny parallels between the two charts. I also believe there are close parallels between the birth of the internet and cryptocurrency. My guess is that Bitcoin will follow the same path as the Nasdaq. Right now, we are in the consolidation phase of cryptocurrency and within a few years it will eclipse the values we saw in 2017.Since speculation in the price of Bitcoin is essentially gambling, it’s easy to draw comparisons with gambling at a casino.This next chart shows you interest over time on Google for the keyword ‘Bitcoin casino’ (blue), with the grey line representing the Bitcoin price in US dollars over the same time period. 20th July 2018 | By Joanne Christie Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Poker Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Online Gambling Nick Garner says the recent volatility in cryptocurrency prices was not the beginning of the end but rather the start of a period of consolidation Regions: Europe US Notice the correlation between interest in cryptocurrency and gambling with cryptocurrency… In my experience, cryptocurrency gambling is directly correlated to the amount of interest in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency prices.As cryptocurrency gains more acceptance in years to come, I think cryptocurrency gambling will follow in parallel.The appeal of crypto gambling Players enjoy the privacy and freedom of choice cryptocurrency gives them. We have players from the most unlikely territories, Bangladesh for instance.Players can exercise their freedom of choice and gamble using cryptocurrency because there is no direct government control over Bitcoin and moving currency across borders is frictionless.However, it’s not all good. Bitcoin transaction costs have had a big effect on turnover. When the Bitcoin bubble got very frothy in the midwinter of 2017, so did transaction costs. At the peak, it cost US$55 equivalent to send Bitcoin somewhere. For perspective, a year earlier it cost $0.29 to make the same transaction. Today the same transaction is around $0.75.Whenever there was a big price move or transaction price hike, we would see players stay away for a couple of weeks and once volatility had settled, they would return.Generally, for my players, they see Bitcoin as a means of exchange so they can follow their interests without hindrance.The long-term future for cryptocurrency gambling In the long term I believe the utility of cryptocurrency will be accepted as the norm, i.e. cross-border, immediate, low transaction costs and no chargebacks. However, there will be more and more licensed jurisdictions, with an increased tax take from governments.When you combine the frictionless nature of cryptocurrency, along with emerging technology around smart contracts — agreements digitally encoded that are flexible, but 100% trustworthy for numerous reasons — you get some interesting possibilities.Smart contracts allow for disintermediation, i.e. getting rid of central banks and third parties which we trust to supervise contracts such as lawyers, corporate entities, etc. The lack of middle men means the process of value exchange becomes far more efficient.Gambling is essentially a value exchange between a player and an operator. If you take sportsbook gambling, it’s a value exchange either during or after an event. With smart contracts you can get very clever about the terms in which the value exchange is completed. You could have in-play betting (nothing new), but you could also have an open secondary exchange for bets that have not yet been settled, just like a stock market.These are just a couple of examples of what gambling can be. Ultimately gambling operators want to satisfy players and with this emerging technology, they’ll be able to offer better odds and be able to handle aggressive, smart players. In effect, you will get the benefits of exchange betting without the need for a huge pool of players. In other words, you don’t have to be the Betfair exchange to compete with Betfair exchange.I did some analysis of the crypto gambling scene and used a tool called Digimetr to look at the web traffic statistics from 47 different crypto casinos and sportsbooks. I then aggregated all of this data and created this chart, which covers the period January to June 2018.last_img read more

Global Gaming’s Swedish struggles – Part 2

first_img Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Strategy Casino & games 26th July 2019 | By contenteditor Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Global Gaming’s Swedish struggles – Part 2 Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden In the second part of iGamingBusiness.com’s extensive interview with Global Gaming chief executive Tobias Fagerlund, he discusses the operator’s plans to fight back against the decision to revoke its Swedish operating licence. Read part one here.Fagerlund argues that more than anything, Global has been the victim of a lack of clarity over regulations.This is not an isolated claim. Operator association Branschföreningen för onlinespel (BOS) has demanded an urgent meeting with the regulator over how how it interprets certain elements of the legislation, such as the prohibition on sportsbook markets featuring competitors aged 18 and under. Gaming Innovation Group (GiG) has even temporarily withdrawn its sports betting product on its Rizk and Guts brands until the regulator explains how it will enforce these rules. Many operators have pledged to appeal fines, arguing that the lack of clarity, rather than any malicious intent, has seen them fall foul of regulations.“[Since] the law was introduced, when it was presented to the parliament, we have been trying to seek some sort to guidance, some sort of clarity,” Fagerlund says. “We asked the regulator, even asked the policymakers directly, because there are a lot of things in the regulations that need clarified, and there are many that think so.“I think the policymakers themselves believe there is a lot of clarification needed,” he adds.While he admits that Global was guilty of a number of failings, he maintains that these have been addressed, and the operator is now compliant with Swedish regulations. In fact, he adds, the potential risks posed by lax money laundering controls is being overstated by the SGA.“I think it’s really interesting [that] one of the accusations made against us was the money laundering violations,” he says. “We only accept deposits via Trustly on our Swedish site – transactions must be verified using the digital ID linked to a Swedish bank account.“To then accuse us of money laundering is very very strange. The risk assessment was not perfect, I can agree with that, but to claim that there’s a great risk of money laundering is just a false statement, and the SGA knows that.”He highlights a case from November last year, which saw a high-profile operator in November fined for “serious and systematic deficiencies” in its anti-money laundering and customer risk assessment controls. This company, which is appealing the fine, has been licensed and is currently performing strongly in the market.“We accept that we should face a fine or a severe warning, but to revoke our licence is beyond reason,” Fagerlund says.Fighting back It’s for these reasons that Fagerlund remains confident that Global will prevail in its appeal. However, its bid to have the revocation suspended while this appeal is heard is not off to a good start. The first step, in the Administrative Court of Linköping ended in failure. The case then progressed to the Administrative Court of Appeal, which upheld the first court’s decision.Provided the operator is granted leave to take its appeal further, it will progress to the Supreme Administrative Court. However, Fagerlund notes, the court does not take up all the cases it is transferred.“We think we have a good case even for that, based on the fact we are getting a severe punishment, based on a widely criticised law,” he says. “Of course we don’t plan our future business based on wishful thinking that the SC will take on the case.“But we be focused on doing the right thing for the business,” he explains. “We therefore have to plan for not being able to do business in Sweden for the duration of the appeals process.”And let’s face it, Sweden contributed a “substantial chunk” of Global Gaming’s revenue. Fagerlund says that it wants to, and will, do business in Sweden. How this happens remains to be seen.The operator’s recent partnership with igaming platform provider and white label operator Finnplay could provide a route back into Sweden. This looks set to happen, with NanoCasino to launch as a Finnplay-powered white label site.“[We’ve] looked very carefully into the legal aspects, so we feel we have a clear case to do that,” Fagerlund says.He says this will be carefully cleared with the SGA – “there is still a chance that we will get the inhibition through in the courts” – but if we don’t, we have other ways that are well within the framework of the law and the licensing system to be active in the market.”Should it remain locked out of Sweden, the focus will shift to entering new territories and growing revenue in existing markets, such as Estonia and Malta.“Obviously the Swedish process will raise questions but we think we have very good answers to those questions,” he says.While Fagerlund remains bullish on the operator’s chances of resuming activities in the Swedish market, it faces a battle to do so. He’s under no illusions that it was the operator’s internal failings that led to the regulator’s decision, even if he maintains the punishment was disproportionate.What could work in Global’s favour is that the regulator’s processes and practices are coming in for criticism from the wider sector. If it can argue that this is a wider issue, and not a deserved sanction, it could fight back from the brink.“We suffer a lot from having no Swedish revenue, but we feel confident that we can bounce back, and that the foundations of our business are strong,” he says in conclusion.Yet the SGA, when asked for comment on Fagerlund’s claims, said it stands by its original decision, adding that it has a very different perspective on the matter to Global Gaming. It is awaiting the conclusion of the appeals process, it added. The operator could be facing the fight of its life if it is to resume activities in Sweden. In the second part of iGB’s extensive interview with Global Gaming chief executive Tobias Fagerlund, he discusses the operator’s plans to fight back against the decision to revoke its Swedish operating licence.last_img read more

SIS appoints Calderon to lead Spanish and LatAm sales

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 4th November 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter SIS appoints Calderon to lead Spanish and LatAm sales Betting services supplier Sports Information Services (SIS) has appointed Angel Calderon as digital sales manager. Betting services supplier Sports Information Services (SIS) has appointed Angel Calderon as digital sales manager.Calderon, who served in a range of roles in 11 years at Codere, including most recently as director of operations for Europe, will focus mostly on the Spanish and Latin American markets in the role.Calderon had also worked at digital security company Spamina and telecom company Jazztel.“I am thrilled to have joined such a professional and passionate team at SIS and I am thoroughly looking forward to helping to drive our 24/7 betting channels offer to operators in both mature and emerging markets, increasing their betting revenues,” Calderon said.Sandra McWilliams, sales director at SIS, said Calderon’s experience with horse racing and of Spanish-speaking regions were major reasons why he was selected for the role.“Angel is a welcome addition to our growing Sales team,” McWilliams said. “His experience in both American and European horse racing, coupled with significant omnichannel knowledge of the betting & gaming sector within Spanish-speaking markets, will be invaluable in helping SIS to further broaden its international footprint.”center_img Email Address Regions: Europe LATAM Southern Europe Spain People Topics: People Sports bettinglast_img read more

Tower Hamlets council to block betting shops near schools

first_img Tower Hamlets council to block betting shops near schools Regions: UK & Ireland Legal & compliance AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The local council for the London borough of Tower Hamlets has adopted a new gambling policy that means the council may restrict the opening of new gambling premises near schools, playgrounds, hospitals and residential homes for the elderly. Tags: OTB and Betting Shops Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter The local council for the London borough of Tower Hamlets has adopted a new gambling policy that means the council may restrict the opening of new gambling premises near schools, playgrounds, hospitals and residential homes for the elderly.In addition, the policy would allow the council to block the building of new gambling premises near any venues where a Gamblers Anonymous meeting is held.The new policy will come into effect on 14 December.“We know that gambling can take people down a difficult path and that the young, the vulnerable and those experiencing financial hardship are at particular risk of being lured in,” Ann Sutcliffe, corporate director of the council’s Place Directorate, the body responsible for overseeing environmental and economic activity in the borough, said.The new policy, part of a renewal that occurs every three years, follows a 12 week consultation that ran from April to June this year. During this process, the council noted, residents expressed concern about the impact of high street gambling shops on their community.The council said the changes were in keeping with the three objectives licensing authorities must consider under the Gambling Act 2005.The Act orders local authorities to prevent gambling from being a source of crime or disorder, ensure that it is conducted in a fair and open way and protect children and other vulnerable people from being harmed or exploited by gambling. Topics: Legal & compliance 26th November 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Email Addresslast_img read more

European Casino Association vice-chair departs

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: Europe Dietmar Hoscher has resigned from his role as vice chairman of the European Casino Association (ECA) with immediate effect. Casino & games Topics: Casino & games People Strategy Dietmar Hoscher has resigned from his role as vice chairman of the European Casino Association (ECA) with immediate effect.Hoscher, who has stepped down from the position due to serious health reasons, had been involved with the ECA board of directors since 2011. He was re-elected three times and his current term was due to run until February 2021.Within the ECA’s board, Hoscher oversaw two working groups that focused on responsible gambling and corporate social responsibility, as well as on legal and regulatory affairs.During his time with the ECA, Hoscher was involved with a number of projects, including being the initiator of the ECA Responsible Gambling Framework, the first ever catalogue of responsible gambling measures and processes.Hoscher also had a spell as the ECA’s head of legal and regulatory affairs, where he structured its information campaigns to raise awareness among the European Union institutions, regulators, non-profit organisations and other stakeholders in the sector.In addition, he represented the ECA European Parliament hearings, including in the discussions about anti-money laundering.“Mr Hoscher was an important leader within the ECA, always focused on the topics that challenge our industry – illegal, unlicensed gambling, money laundering, the protection of consumers, to name the most important ones,” ECA chairman Per Jaldung said.“The sustainability of the licensed casino industry was a mission for him and he made sure the ECA became a member of the UN Global Compact as the first and only gambling trade organisation. He was a dedicated representative of the ECA brand and was invited as a speaker to many of the major gambling congresses worldwide.“We will miss him, but we understand his decision. We wish him all the best for his future endeavours”.In September last year, the ECA announced that Philip Easthill had stepped down as its secretary general, while the organisation also set out a new structure for its secretariat.Following Easthill’s departure, the ECA implemented a new structure whereby Veronika Tisold now acts as its executive director, with support from Casinos Austria’s corporate social responsibility officer Hermann Pamminger as senior advisor.center_img 21st January 2020 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter European Casino Association vice-chair departs Email Addresslast_img read more

BGC announces action plan for safer gambling amid Covid-19

first_imgCasino & games Standards body the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) has published a new ten-point action plan to ensure its members keep customers safe during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis.The pledges, published in the wake of new consumer advice from the Gambling Commission, build on actions and interventions already carried out by BGC members as part of their efforts to protect customers. Members will now be required to step monitoring of customer behaviour, as well as delivering tailored responses and new actions to reflect the “unprecedented situation” of social distancing and home working.“In this time of national crisis, with so many people self-isolating and social distancing at home, it is vital that we do everything possible to ensure safer gambling and to protect potentially vulnerable or at risk people,” BGC chief executive Michael Dugher (pictured) said. 27th March 2020 | By contenteditor Regions: UK & Ireland Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance People Strategy Slots Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Slot Machines “We all know that levels of gambling have plummeted not just because of betting shop or casino closures, but because of the absence of sport, which is also fundamental to online betting,” he explained.The pledges will come into force immediately, ensuring anyone betting online that may be more vulnerable as a result of the crisis is properly protected.Throughout the crisis, BGC members will increase safer gambling messages across all sites, and in direct communications with customers.It will step up interventions if customers increase time and money spent beyond pre-crisis patterns, and actively promote deposit limits.Members will work to ensure advertising is appropriate and responsible, including monitoring volume, and report all illegal and rogue advertising from unlicensed operators.Affiliates, which have come under increased scrutiny in the past week, will be subject to a ‘one strike and you’re out’ policy.Operators will also signpost links to GamCare and the National Gambling Helpline, as well as self-exclusion system Gamstop, which is to become mandatory for all operators from next Monday (31 March).Despite the sporting shut-down, BGC members will commit to continuing their reserach, education and treatment (RET) fuding.Finally, they will look to support their staff through welfare checks and well-being help, as well as providing volunteers and facilities to support the government’s efforts to mitigate the effects of the pandemic.“Although gambling levels have dropped during the Covid-19 crisis, our commitment to safer gambling is being stepped up,” Dugher added. “It is important that we help our customers stay safe and in control of their gambling during these difficult times.”GVC Holdings, which welcomed the BGC’s intervention, has implemented a series of additional safeguards for customers as a result of the pandemic. As mandated by the Council’s pledges, it will step up communication and responsible gambling messaging, as well as providing new guidance to affiliate partners.It will also launch new controls, such as curfew setting and stake limit controls on slots, as well as new reverse withdrawal settings, to prevent customers from having a change of heart and cancelling the withdrawal to continue gambling. These complement the operator’s existing deposit and time limits, and self-exclusion functionality.GVC will add two new markers of harm indicators to its safer gambling algorithm, to make it easier to spot unhealthy play patterns at an earlier stage. This will see the operator review player behaviour pre- and post-home isolation, with a sliding scale of interventions initiated that could ultimately result in accounts being suspended or closed.“At this time of unprecedented uncertainty, we are more committed than ever to keeping our customers safe while they enjoy our products,” GVC chief executive Kenny Alexander explained.“As an industry, we have a clear responsibility to protect the vulnerable and we warmly welcome the coordinated approach announced today by the BGC which provides a template for strengthening player protections.”The BGC’s pledges come after the Gambling Related Harm All Party Parliamentary Group this week called for operators to introduce a £50 daily gambling limit for customers during the crisis.Speaking to iGB, the group’s chair Carolyn Harris MP said she had been made aware of increased advertising by operators, adding it was “only fair” that operators do more to protect consumers at their most vulnerable.center_img Standards body the Betting and Gaming Council (BGC) has published a new ten-point action plan to ensure its members keep customers safe during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis. BGC announces action plan for safer gambling amid Covid-19 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

Blacklisting threatens to restart Nigerian regulatory battle

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Legal & compliance Lottery The long-running dispute between Nigeria’s gambling regulator the National Lottery Regulatory Commission (NLRC) and the Lagos State Lottery Board (LSLB) could resume after the state regulator blacklisted a number of operators licensed by its federal counterpart. Blacklisting threatens to restart Nigerian regulatory battle Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Africa Western Africa Nigeria Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops The long-running dispute between Nigeria’s gambling regulator the National Lottery Regulatory Commission (NLRC) and the Lagos State Lottery Board (LSLB) could resume after the state regulator blacklisted a number of operators licensed by its federal counterpart.The NLRC noted “with dismay” that the LSLB had added GabLotto, Give ‘n’ take, MLotto, WesternLotto, WescoLotto, Chopbarh, Betbiga, Betwinner, Bet24hrs and Truthware Solutions, operator of the Zoomlifestyle lottery, to its blacklist.The Lagos board also publicly claimed Truthware Solutions was conducting its business without necessary approval, to discourage citizens in Nigeria’s largest urban area from playing.However, all these companies have secured federal licences, which the NLRC said precluded the LSLB from blocking their operations in the state.
“As the apex regulator of lotteries and gaming in Nigeria, the NLRC is not in doubt of its mandate and powers conferred on it by the National Lottery Act 2005, which is the contemporary law governing lottery and gaming activities in modern Nigeria,” the NLRC said.“Any operator licensed by the federal government has the right and is free to conduct business of lottery and gaming in any part of the federation (Lagos State inclusive).”It argued that the validity of its licences across all states was supported by a “plethora” of court judgements, which ultimately invalidated the blacklisting of the brands in Lagos.The dispute threatens to restart a long-running battle between the NLRC and LSLB over regulatory jurisdiction. The state lottery board, which was formed before the national regulator, has previously cracked down on operators licensed at a federal level, demanding these businesses secure an LSLB licence in order to continue targeting players in the state.This ultimately led to Lagos States’ then-governor Akinwunmi Ambode stepping in to mediate between the parties, in May 2019. Legal & compliance 4th May 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

Sweden’s KO rules Svenska Spel TV spot is advertising

first_img Topics: Legal & compliance Lottery Marketing & affiliates AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 27th May 2020 | By contenteditor Sweden’s KO rules Svenska Spel TV spot is advertising Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Legal & compliancecenter_img Sweden’s consumer ombudsman has ruled that Trisskrapet, a regular TV spot broadcast on free-to-air channel TV4 in which guests play Svenska Spel scratchcards, is a form of advertising, and must therefore include responsible gaming information.Following a complaint from operator association Branscheförenigen för Onlienspel (BOS) in June 2019, the Konsumentombudsmanen (KO) concluded that the segment, which airs on the Nyhetsmorgon show, should be flagged advert for the former monopoly.The KO has also ordered the operator to provide information of the contract with TV4 that facilitates the show.BOS first raised concerns about the segments in May last year, noting that while these segments are designed to drive participation in the games, they do not contain any responsible gaming information required by law. It argued at the time they should include elements such as the 18+ age limit or information about the national problem gambling helpline.The association’s secretary general Gustaf Hoffstedt said he welcomed the KO’s decision, describing the lack of consumer protection information in the Trisskrapet segments as “the elephant in the room” when it comes to games and consumer protection.“The regulatory framework for consumer protection for real-money games exists for a good reason, and the rules must be followed,” he explained. “There is no exception for government-owned gaming companies.Svenska Spel has appealed the decision, however, which Hoffstedt said he could not understand.“Why does Svenska Spel not act transparently and comply with KO’s decision? It is extremely strange that the state-owned gaming company opposes the directives that come from the state authority that exists to promote safe and secure gambling,” he said.In related news, the KO last week said there had been a positive development in terms of advertising content in the country, with operators more compliant with regulations set out in the Swedish Gaming Act.Having examined gambling ads across a number of channels, including TV, podcasts, magazines, the internet and social media, it said the volume was unchanged from 2019 – when concerns about excessive advertising were raised. Marketing of jackpots and bonus offers had also remained consistent year-over-year, it added.The promotion of bonus offers was an area in which improvements had been made, but where there were still many shortcomings, it warned however.“The Consumer Agency believes that in many cases clearer, clearer and more easily accessible information on the terms and conditions of the offer should be provided,” it said. “This applies both to initial banner ads and to the gaming companies’ websites.” Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Email Address Sweden’s consumer ombudsman has ruled that Trisskrapet, a regular TV spot broadcast on free-to-air channel TV4 in which guests play Svenska Spel scratchcards, is a form of advertising, and must therefore include responsible gaming information.last_img read more

New DK marketing laws cause headache for sponsors, DBU warns

first_img New DK marketing laws cause headache for sponsors, DBU warns Legal & compliance Denmark’s Consumer Ombudsman (Forbrugerombudsmanden) has rejected criticism of new marketing laws that prohibit the display of gambling brands alongside the logos of banks, despite concerns the regulations will harm football clubs across the country.   Danish consumer ombudsman Forbrugerombudsmanden has rejected criticism of new marketing laws that prohibit the display of gambling brands alongside the logos of banks, despite concerns the regulations will harm football clubs across the country.  The amendments to the country’s marketing regulations came into effect from 1 July, and prevent products such as loans and credit cards being promoted alongside gambling products. This aims to avoid suggesting a link between short-term funding options being used to fund gambling.The issue was brought to light after the Danish Football Union (DBU) questioned the Forbrugerombudsmanden how this change would impact its existing sponsorship deals with financial services group Arbejdernes Landsbank and Oddset, a betting brand of majority state-owned lottery operator Danske Spil.The Ombudsman informed the DBU that logos for Arbejdernes Landsbank and Oddset can no longer appear together on any surfaces, including players’ and coaches’ clothes, and interview backdrops. Arbejdernes Landsbank does not offer short-term loans, but as a bank, it offers a range of lending services, meaning it falls in the scope of the law.The DBU warned that this interpretation could harm its relationship with both Arbejdernes Landsbank and Oddset, while the new law could also have negative implications on football clubs across Denmark that are sponsored by both gambling operators and banks.Oddset, for example, recently partnered Aarhus Gymnastikforening (AGF) which is also a partner of Arbejdernes Landsbank, adding to an existing deal with Aalborg BK, which is partnered with bank Spar Nord.However, Forbrugerombudsmanden stood by the law, saying that the display of banking-related and gambling logos within any vicinity would be classed as in breach of the law.The ombudsman said that if the logos appeared on different surfaces that were then pictured together – such as one logo on an interview backdrop, and the other on players’ kit – this would also be regarded as a violation of the law.“Forbrugerombudsmanden notes it is expressly stated in the draft legislation that the marketing of consumer loan companies’ names, logos or other characteristics is covered by the ban, regardless of where the marketing takes place,” the ombusdman said.In response, DBU director Jakob Jensen said while the governing body will abide by the law, he was “surprised” that legislation would impact two companies – Arbejdernes Landsbank and Danske Spill – that are part-owned either by the Danish state or by its population.“We are surprised that the legislation is formulated so broadly that it must affect the close cooperation we have, both for the Danish national football teams and for the clubs,” Jensen said. “At the same time, we note that several political commentators this summer have stated that this is not the intention of the legislation. “DBU has had Arbejdernes Landsbank Bank and Oddset/Danske Spil as partners for both the men’s national team and the women’s national team for several years,” he added. “That is why it concerns us that this [change in law] should suddenly have such a detrimental effect as the ombudsman’s response suggests.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newslettercenter_img 18th August 2020 | By contenteditor Regions: Europe Nordics Denmark Topics: Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Email Addresslast_img read more