PostScript changes corporate name to Acorn Marketing

first_imgSara Blum, President & CEO of PostScript, Inc, announced today that the company has changed its corporate name to Acorn Marketing, Inc as of the first of the year.‘The new name, Acorn Marketing, better represents the company and our services,’ states Blum. ‘As an organization, we are driven by four core values: integrity, quality, creativity and community. The organic nature of our vision and values is evidenced in our tagline, marketing for growth,’ she continued.The original name, PostScript, Inc reflected the founder, Peter Post who is no longer an interest holder in the company. The company has used the brand identity of the acorn and tagline since 2005.Acorn Marketing serves clients of all sizes creating brochures, advertisements and websites; writing copy; hashing out strategies and branding companies to name a few services. Everything Acorn Marketing does, it does with an eye for results. So clients get more than a website or business card or brochure, they get a product that sells their brand. Acorn Marketing also creates custom QR Codes turning otherwise ugly inkblots into little branded works of art.Blum’s career in marketing began in 1987 and she has worked her way through virtually every position in the agency including typesetter, graphic designer, art director, new media director, public relations specialist, creative director, managing partner and ultimately president and CEO. Blum has been an integral part of creating the Shelburne Village Dog Park and remains committed to providing pro bono services to organizations that support children and animals.Acorn Marketing is a full-service marketing firm, located in Burlington, Vermont. Serving some of Vermont’s finest businesses, Acorn Marketing has a reputation for creativity, quality and service. Acorn Marketing offers marketing strategies, website and interactive media design, search engine optimization, media planning and placement, branding, corporate identity, graphic design, copywriting and customized QR codes among its varied services.Burlington, VTlast_img read more

Chilean visit to Fort Hood sets framework for intelligence sharing

first_imgBy Dialogo December 25, 2014 The event was one of several agreed to actions signed into accord during the 2013 U.S./Chile army-to-army staff talks. “This experience has been very enriching,” said Lara. “I, as the professor of the school of intelligence, will be able to take those lessons learned and apply them to different processes to compliment our intelligence structure into day-to-day activities.” The purpose of the visit was to strengthen doctrine and operational capabilities, enhance interoperability between the United States and Chile, encourage intelligence sharing and to strengthen the Chilean army’s ability to counter transnational threats. Army South’s mantra “strength through partnership” was exemplified throughout the exchange according to the participants. “We have a great history with Chile and exchanges like this ensure we continue that relationship well into the future,” said Maj. Miguel Bolivar, Military Intelligence Readiness Command. Army South’s mantra “strength through partnership” was exemplified throughout the exchange according to the participants. “These types of engagements are very beneficial to us because they allow us to enhance our relationships with the members of the U.S. military while also improve our capabilities,” said Chilean Capt. Cristian Lara, an instructor at the Military Intelligence Academy in Santiago, Chile. The UAV presentations focused on the capabilities and limitations of the different platforms, specifically the human interaction needed to ensure success for each UAV mission. The UAV presentations focused on the capabilities and limitations of the different platforms, specifically the human interaction needed to ensure success for each UAV mission. During the visit to Fort Hood, staff members from the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division gave the Chilean delegation presentations and demonstrations on various intelligence gathering techniques as well as demonstrations on intelligence gathering platforms such as the RQ-11 Raven unmanned aerial vehicle, the RQ-7 Shadow UAV and the MQ-1 Grey Eagle UAV. “We wanted to get a better understanding of the U.S. intelligence doctrine and learn from the experiences in the recent conflicts,” said Lara. “We would also like to learn how to apply those lessons learned to our own organic intelligence doctrine.” Specifically, the two-week visit helped to familiarize the Chileans with U.S. Army techniques, tactics, and procedures for intelligence support at the tactical level brigade combat team military intelligence company. Specifically, the two-week visit helped to familiarize the Chileans with U.S. Army techniques, tactics, and procedures for intelligence support at the tactical level brigade combat team military intelligence company. The purpose of the visit was to strengthen doctrine and operational capabilities, enhance interoperability between the United States and Chile, encourage intelligence sharing and to strengthen the Chilean army’s ability to counter transnational threats. During the visit to Fort Hood, staff members from the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division gave the Chilean delegation presentations and demonstrations on various intelligence gathering techniques as well as demonstrations on intelligence gathering platforms such as the RQ-11 Raven unmanned aerial vehicle, the RQ-7 Shadow UAV and the MQ-1 Grey Eagle UAV. “This experience has been very enriching,” said Lara. “I, as the professor of the school of intelligence, will be able to take those lessons learned and apply them to different processes to compliment our intelligence structure into day-to-day activities.” “We wanted to get a better understanding of the U.S. intelligence doctrine and learn from the experiences in the recent conflicts,” said Lara. “We would also like to learn how to apply those lessons learned to our own organic intelligence doctrine.” “These types of engagements are very beneficial to us because they allow us to enhance our relationships with the members of the U.S. military while also improve our capabilities,” said Chilean Capt. Cristian Lara, an instructor at the Military Intelligence Academy in Santiago, Chile. “We have a great history with Chile and exchanges like this ensure we continue that relationship well into the future,” said Maj. Miguel Bolivar, Military Intelligence Readiness Command. The event was one of several agreed to actions signed into accord during the 2013 U.S./Chile army-to-army staff talks. last_img read more

Colleges Flush With Cash Saddle Poorest Students With Debt

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Annie Waldman and Sisi Wei, ProPublicaNew York University is among the country’s wealthiest schools. Backed by its $3.5 billion endowment, the school has built campuses in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai, invested billions in SoHo real estate, and given its star faculty loans to buy summer homes.But the university does less than many other schools when it comes to one thing: helping its poor students.A ProPublica analysis based on new data from the U.S. Department of Education shows that students from low-income families graduate from NYU saddled with huge federal loans. The school’s Pell Grant recipients – students from families that make less than $30,000 a year – owe an average of $23,250 in federal loans after graduation.That’s more federal loan debt than low-income students take on at for-profit giant University of Phoenix, though NYU graduates have higher earnings and default less on their debt.NYU is not the only university with a billion-dollar endowment to leave its poorest students with heavy debt loads. More than a quarter of the nation’s 60 wealthiest universities leave their low-income students owing an average of more than $20,000 in federal loans.At the University of Southern California, which has a $4.6 billion endowment, low-income students graduate with slightly more debt than NYU’s graduates: $23,375. At Boston University ($1.5 billion endowment), it’s $27,000, and at Wake Forest University ($1.1 billion endowment) low-income students graduate with $29,150 in debt.This new data on student debt is drawn from numbers that the Obama administration assembled as part of a planned effort to create grades for every college. In the face of fierce lobbying from universities, the administration backed away, but has made much of the data public on a new website called College Scorecard. ProPublica has used that material to create Debt By Degrees, an interactive database that allows you to search information for almost 7,000 schools. The data provides an unprecedented level of detail on the financial burden that the poorest college students face, showing for the first time how much federal debt poor students take on compared to their wealthier peers, and how well these students are able to repay their loans. The database also shows how much graduates earn on average after leaving school.The implications of these numbers can be far-reaching. Studies have shown that even small debts can increase a student’s chances of dropping out, particularly for minorities and low-income students. Also, federal loans, which are typically capped at $27,000 over four years, often don’t cover the full expense of college. Many students also take on private bank loans or work jobs outside school.“Student debt is not the same to every borrower,” said Mark Huelsman, a senior analyst at Demos, a public policy nonprofit. “It can look a lot different to a first generation student from a very modest economic background than to someone going to graduate school getting a law degree.”Indeed, undergraduates take a fraction of the loans of graduate students but default at much higher rates. Debt can put low-income young adults at a disadvantage for years to come, limiting a graduate’s ability to save, get a mortgage, or get the job they aspire to.“At the end of the day, you’re talking about households that don’t have nearly as much wealth to fall back on,” said Huelsman.Rebecca Arthur wanted nothing more than to study photography at Tisch, NYU’s arts school. Her mother, however, made less than $25,000 a year working at a nursing home, so Arthur knew the school’s four-year price tag of over $250,000 would be a stretch. When Arthur was accepted, she was shocked – not only because she had gotten into her dream school, but also because the school only offered modest financial aid.“The first bill was $32,000 and it was more than my mom made in a year,” she said. “Why would they accept me if they knew I couldn’t afford it?”Arthur tried to crowdfund the remaining amount of her tuition, but it was only when her mother died a month before school started that NYU agreed to take a second look at her financial aid package. Although they increased her aid, she works four jobs and expects to graduate with over $24,000 in loans.“The one downside to NYU is that money is always a big problem,” said Arthur, who is now a sophomore at the university. “People that really want [to go to NYU] and deserve it shouldn’t have to fight for it.”In response to recent criticism of its financial priorities, NYU says it has more than doubled financial aid in the last decade and that average student debt has decreased significantly in the past five years. The school also enrolls a greater percentage of Pell Grant recipients than other elite schools. Finally, NYU points out that its endowment is actually quite modest on a per-student basis, since NYU has far more students than many other elite universities.“NYU is deeply concerned about the issues of cost and debt,” John Beckman, NYU’s vice president for public affairs, told ProPublica. “NYU has made tremendous strides in improving financial aid.” NYU’s full response can be found here.While NYU students average debt from both federal and private loans has gone down in the past five years, it’s about the same as a decade ago. And though NYU’s financial aid has doubled over the past decade, its revenue from tuition and fees has nearly doubled as well. Faculty and students have protested NYU’s $6 billion expansion plan, saying more should be spent on financial aid.A government report released today along with the data noted just how wide a disparity there can be in the prices poor students pay at competitor schools: Poor students pay an average of $8,086 per year at Columbia University ($8.2 billion endowment) versus $25,441 at NYU.“Schools talk so much about how they’re about helping low-income students,” said Stephen Burd, a senior policy analyst at New America Foundation. “But their words and actions are so different.”Overall, students at nonprofit universities fare far better than those at for-profit schools and community colleges. One recent study shows that students at public and nonprofit schools typically have lower default rates and higher earnings.Out of the nearly 2,000 nonprofit colleges that ProPublica analyzed, a handful of wealthy schools do particularly well in serving the needs of low-income students.Vassar College, with an endowment of close to $1 billion, charges its poorest students a quarter of what NYU does, and they graduate with less than half the debt.Only a decade ago, Vassar looked little different than NYU. However, in 2006, the school hired a new president, Catharine Bond Hill, an academic who specializes in college access and affordability. During her first few years, Hill instituted need-blind admissions, accepting students regardless of their financial background. She also created a policy of replacing loans with grants to poorer students. And to bolster low-income applicants to the school, she initiated an aggressive recruiting campaign in poorer neighborhoods, partnering with pre-existing college prep programs.After 10 years, these changes have made Vassar one of the most affordable colleges in the country for low-income students. Today, over 20 percent of Vassar students receive Pell Grants. That’s double the percentage of low-income students of a decade ago.“Schools that have the resources should be giving out more in need-based grant aid,” Hill told ProPublica.Other schools that have helped level the playing field for low-income students include Amherst College and Williams College, both in Western Massachusetts. Nearly 20 percent of students at these schools receive Pell Grants and they graduate with less than $10,000 of federal loans. Berea College in Kentucky charges no tuition and only accepts low-income students.Vassar’s Hill told ProPublica that other wealthy schools need to do more to recruit low-income students and to make college affordable for them. A White House report that accompanied today’s data release notes that poor kids are often discouraged by schools’ sticker prices, and do not know that they might qualify for financial aid.“We know there are talented students out there and recent work has shown there are ways to get them into our pools,” Hill said.Harvard ($35.9 billion endowment), Princeton ($20.9 billion endowment), and Yale ($23.9 billion endowment) all give generous support and even free tuition to low-income students. But they do not enroll many of them. At Harvard, only 10 percent of the students receive Pell Grants.Asked about their modest number of low-income students, a Harvard official said that school is committed to enrolling the best students, regardless of their financial circumstances.Co-author Sisi Wei was a paid adjunct professor at NYU in spring 2015.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more

Credit unions fill gap in small-business lending, NAFCU tells Congress

first_img 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU’s Carrie Hunt reiterated the association’s support for credit unions working with the Small Business Administration to provide loans to member small businesses in a letter ahead of a House Small Business subcommittee hearing today on SBA programs.The Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Tax and Capital Access is holding a hearing at 10 a.m. Eastern today on “Improving Capital Access Programs within the SBA.”In addition to backing credit unions’ work with SBA, Hunt, NAFCU’s senior vice president of government affairs and general counsel, gave subcommittee Chairman Tom Rice, R-S.C., and Ranking Member Judy Chu, D-Calif., suggestions on how to improve SBA programs to help facilitate more lending. She suggested exempting all loans made through SBA programs from credit unions’ member business lending cap; that would “increase the capital credit unions could provide small businesses.” Currently, only SBA-guaranteed loan dollars are excluded from credit unions’ MBL cap.In February, NAFCU and SBA inked an agreement aimed at getting more credit unions to increase their lending to member-small businesses through SBA micro loan programs. NAFCU also continues to support legislation, including H.R. 1188, that would raise the MBL cap for credit unions. continue reading »last_img read more

Roslyn’s Center Cuts Customers Can Now ‘Meat Again’ in the Hamptons

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Doug Cohen and Justin Aronoff are a young pair of butchers whose passion for meat has spread far beyond their Center Cuts store in Roslyn.Out on the East End some loyal customers won’t go for even a weekend without having their culinary creations to enjoy. To satisfy those roving carnivores, these two men are taking their show on the road…to the Hamptons and beyond.“We went out and bought a big refrigerated truck,” said Cohen, who just turned 27 over the Memorial Day holiday, “and we’re going to be doing home deliveries on Fridays and Saturdays out there.”Cohen is the elder of the pair; his partner, Aronoff, is only 22, but they talk about their craft like two old-timers who’ve been in the business for generations. After graduating with a degree in hospitality and restaurant management, Cohen was managing the now-defunct Meat House on Northern Boulevard in Roslyn when Aronoff came in one day looking for a job.“We hated each other instantly,” recalled Cohen, making Aronoff burst out laughing. Soon they were spending late nights at Starbucks talking about the butcher business.“And that was before we even knew what we were going to do,” he added. “But we both knew that we wanted to own our own place.”Another thing they had in common was their close connection to the area and their clientele. Aronoff went to Roslyn High School and Cohen went to The Wheatley School in Old Westbury.“You can’t get closer to the neighborhood than that,” said Aronoff.While they were plotting their future, The Meat House and its nearby rival, Prime Time Butchers, were going under. Far from seeing that decline as a sign that the vegetarians had taken over and everybody would be eating nothing but tofu from then on, these guys saw it as an opportunity.Dry Aged Ribeye from Center Cuts. (Credit: Center Cuts/Facebook)As for going organic, when they opened Center Cuts in 2014, they stocked 100-percent grass-fed beef but the demand for it wasn’t as strong as they anticipated.“In all honesty, it’s a little tougher, a little less tasty than a prime steak, which has that really buttery, really rich flavor,” said Cohen. “A lot of our customers are looking for that, so that’s what we sell more of.”All the meat and poultry in Center Cuts is free of hormones and antibiotics, Cohen claims. He says they’ll gladly order grass-fed beef to please a customer “but it’s just less popular” so they don’t keep it around.Wait a minute: Considering on online MBA? There’s many benefits to pursuing a master’s in business administration online rather than the traditional in-class settingAs the summer heats up, so does their schedule. These days Cohen and Aronoff are busy barbecuing for families other than their own because the catering side of their operation is simply sizzling.“We’re going to be out in the Hamptons, doing a party at somebody’s house,” said Cohen. “We have parties all over the neighborhood. We go there, we bring our chefs and servers and everything, and we cook for them.” They’re booked up through June and July is filling up fast. And that’s their weekend plans. On weekdays they’re often catering lunches to financial firms and companies in the area such as Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo, and UPS. A typical order might entail five or six full trays of food.“The offices love our maple-bourbon chicken breasts, sliced, with an orzo salad and sweet mashed potatoes,” said Aronoff. “It’s healthy and it’s clean. That’s really popular.”Aronoff says that another one of Center Cuts’ specialties is their “signature house steak tips,” which consists of marinated sirloin steak tips that they place in a vacuum-sealed tumbling machine.“We have two marinades that we do,” said Cohen. “We put the meat in there with the marinade, and it gets really infused into the meat. People go crazy for it. They’re perfect for the grill. Kids love them; adults love them.”They also have a special burger blend of ground brisket and ground boneless short ribs.“They’re both prime cuts,” Cohen explained. “It’s hamburger but it’s like the juiciest, tastiest hamburger you’ve ever had.”As could be expected, the pair was tight-lipped about listing all the ingredients in their marinades.“Our house marinade is a mild Italian [blend],” said Aronoff. “It’s got garlic, onion, and black pepper. We put a little bit of mustard seed in there, and add a little bit of red wine vinegar to give the meat some tenderness. That’s our special house marinade. The other flavor we do is maple bourbon, which people love.”They also have a home-made barbecue rub that they make in-house.“We toast all the spices and we grind them down,” Aronoff explained. “If we do barbecued-style pulled beef, or barbecue-style pulled pork—anything like that—we use that rub in combination with a homemade barbecue sauce, too.”So, you might ask, what do these young men have for lunch, assuming they have the time to sit down and enjoy it?“This is where Justin is really going to shine,” said Cohen. “I’ll let him tell you what he eats.”“We do a steak and cheese hero that we’re known for,” Aronoff said. “We take our house steak tips, and we slice them up. They’re sautéed with peppers and onions, and topped with white American cheese. And that’s our signature sandwich. We put it on regular Italian bread.”That’s about as close to the Philly cheesesteak as Center Cuts gets.“For me,” said Cohen, “I would take a brisket burger, medium rare, with American cheese and smoked bacon. That’s just one man’s opinion.”Just then Gail Aronoff, Justin’s mom, who frequently helps out at the butcher store, happened to be in the office when the young men spoke to the Press.“What about a woman’s opinion?” she volunteered. “Women like the Roslyn!”“We have a sandwich called ‘The Roslyn,’” noted Cohen.“The Roslyn is marinated grilled chicken with roasted red peppers, fresh mozzarella, which we make in-house, and a homemade balsamic dressing that we make in-house, too,” Aronoff helpfully explained.His mom admitted that she “never, never” would have predicted that her 22-year-old son would have become such an accomplished butcher. “I’m proud every day,” Gail Aronoff said enthusiastically. “It’s amazing!”And apparently that’s become an increasingly common reaction from Center Cuts’ customers, who get to savor what Cohen and Aronoff routinely serve up at their meat counter in Roslyn.last_img read more

Growing number of mentally ill Dutch choosing to be killed at euthanasia clinic

first_imgLifeSiteNews 7 August 2015 A growing number of Dutch patients whom their family doctor is not willing to euthanize, including many who are mentally ill but otherwise healthy, are obtaining “help” at the End-of-Life Clinic that opened its doors in 2012, according to half-year statistics just released by the private organization based in The Hague, Netherlands.In the first six months of 2015, almost as many cancer patients were killed by euthanasia at the hands of the clinic as during the whole of 2014: a total of 49 from January through June 2015, as compared to 53 in 2014.Nineteen psychiatric patients obtained euthanasia from the End-of-Life Clinic from January to June 2015: one more than in the whole of 2014, when 18 psychiatric patients who were not dying or otherwise in bad health obtained death from the Clinic.Compared with national euthanasia statistics – about 5,000 a year in the Netherlands – these numbers may seem insignificant. But they underscore growing pressure on the part of euthanasia activists to make access to “chosen death” more easy to obtain, especially for those patients whose suffering is not associated with intolerable pain or a terminal illness.The End-of-Life Clinic was created three years ago by the Dutch Association for a Chosen End of Life (Nederlandse Vereniging voor een Vrijwillig Levenseinde, NVVE), with a view to catering for patients who fall within the recognized categories for legal euthanasia, but whose doctor is either unable or unwilling to honor their request.The clinic’s offices are in The Hague but euthanasia is provided by 40 mobile teams who are expected to work within the limits of the law, mostly for patients who are in a hopeless situation but not terminally ill, dementia patients, people with psychiatric disorders and elderly people suffering from multiple but non-fatal complaints. They kill patients in the “comfort” of their own homes.The fact that the End-of-Life Clinic can exist in the Netherlands was certainly helped by an ever-widening interpretation of the legal criteria for “careful” euthanasia – inversely, its existence is attracting more and more people to take avail of its services and in turn is causing the legal criteria to widen even more.https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/growing-number-of-mentally-ill-dutch-choosing-to-be-killed-at-euthanasia-cllast_img read more

Obaseki Sets up NWPL Super 4 Committee

first_imgAn elated NWFL chairperson, Aisha Falode said this is the first time in the annual of the women championship that a state will deploy its human and material resources to promote and showcase the women football to the highest height.“We cannot say thank you enough to the amiable executive governor of Edo State, Godwin Obaseki and his deputy, Rt. Hon. Philip Shaibu for their uncommon commitment and support for the upcoming NWPL Super Four being hosted in the state capital, Benin City.“The governor is not even contented being the host but is pushing all the buttons to ensure the championship records 100% success.“Or how else could one explain his uncommon disposition and wholeheartedness towards the women’s game and Super Four in particular than his prompt decision to appoint the planning committee for the championship.“The committee is charged with the responsibility to put the structures and logistics for the game in place so that the championship will go on seamlessly at the scheduled date.“Besides, his excellency has equally asked the NWFL board to quickly shift their secretariat to Benin City to ease communication and workings for the championship.“We have never had it this good in the history of the women game as things are simply falling into the right places at the moment.“We will remain eternally grateful the executive governor, deputy and the entire good people of Edo state.“I can assure you that whenever a properly documented history of the women game will be written either now or future the name of the state will be etched in gold.“The NWFL is being challenged to organise the best ever championship in the history of the women game by the uncommon generosity and interest of the governor for the championship.“We will not fail the state, stakeholders, potential sponsors, among others to use the championship to showcase the deep cultural heritage of the state as truly the heartbeat of the nation when it comes to sports,” said Falode.The 2017 NWPL Super Four championship will be hosted in Benin City, Edo state among the quartet, Bayelsa Queens, Delta Queens, Nasarawa Amazons and title holders, Rivers Angels.The winner will be crowned champion of the 2016/17 Nigeria Women Premier League (NWPL) season. Additionally, the winner will go home with a handsome cash prize of N3million while the runners-up will pocket N2million.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Edo State government, hosts of the 2017 Nigeria Women Premier League (NWPL) Super Four, has set up a high powered committee to oversee the successfully hosting of the prime championship.To further demonstrate their wholesome commitment to the success of the annual championship the state governor, Godwin Obaseki has commandeered the Nigeria Women Football League (NWFL) to move the secretariat to the ancient city of Benin to ensure proper coordination and administrative finesse towards a hitch free women league primary football fiesta.last_img read more

High finish in Ireland for English trio

first_img The English trio of Sophie Madden, Dulcie Sverdloff and Gabriella Cowley  – who all represent Essex clubs – finished in the top 15 at the Irish girls’ open stroke play championship at Roganstown. The championship was won by Curtis Cup player Leona Maguire, who was eight shots clear of her closest challenger. She was one-under par for the 54-hole event and the first Irish winner of the title. Sophie Madden (West Essex) led the way for England, finishing in eighth place.  Dulcie Sverdloff (Garon Park) was two shots behind in a share of 11th place. Gabriella Cowley (West Essex) was a stroke further back and joint 13th. Sophie and Gabriella, the English U15 girls’ champion and the Scottish U16 strokeplay winner, both train with the England Golf Select East squad. Dulcie recently won the British Colleges Sport national championship. Leading final results Par 72, CSS 76 74 74 215 Leona Maguire (IRE) 72 69 74 223 Manon Molle (FRA) 76 72 75 Mathilda Cappeliez (FRA) 73 73 77 225 Louise Latorre (FRA) 78 74 73 226 Ailsa Summers (SCO) 81 70 75 227 Marion Veysseyre (FRA) 81 74 72 Celia Mansour (FRA) 76 74 77 228 Sophie Madden (ENG) 78 75 75 229 Olivia Mehaffey (RCD Ladies) 74 79 76 Gudrún Brá Bjorgvinsdottir (ISL) 73 76 80 230 Josephine Farrando (FRA) 78 79 73 Dulcie Sverdloff (ENG) 75 79 76 231 Emma Broze (FRA) 78 78 75 Lesley Atkins (SCO) 77 77 77 Gabriella Cowley (ENG) 76 79 76 Image: Sophie Madden coyright Leaderboard Photography 22 Apr 2012 High finish in Ireland for English trio last_img read more

Charlotte wins qualifer by a whisker

first_img Buckinghamshire county player Charlotte Nutt scored the narrowest of wins to lead the latest 10 qualifiers for the England Golf women’s Grand Medal Final. The 19-year-old won the Midlands South regional final at Tadmarton Heath, Oxfordshire, on countback, pipping Ji-Young Kim, who also plays at a  Buckinghamshire club. Both had rounds of net 74, but Charlotte, a three-handicapper from Beaconsfield, took the honours by virtue of her score on the last six holes.  “I couldn’t believe it,” she said. “It was such a shock. “I double bogeyed 17 and I thought I’d completely lost it and wouldn’t even come in the top 10. But then I got in and found there was another lady and me on 74 – it was a nice surprise.” The 10 qualifiers for the Grand Medal Final at Peterborough Milton Golf Club on June 28 are: Charlotte Nutt (Beaconsfield), Ji-Young Kim (Flackwell Heath), Jenny Gibson (Woburn), Susan Harrison (Harewood Downs), Linda Hunt (Newbury & Crookham), Jane Bennett (Lee-on-the-Solent),  Lema Townsend (Overstone Park), June Morgan (Langdon Hills), Susan Woolaway (Churchill & Blakedown) and Harriet Matthews (Droitwich).   All the regional finalists had returned the best four scores at their club in the England Golf Medals during 2013. Charlotte went straight to the regional final from her county championship, where she reached the semi-finals. When she plays in the Grand Medal Final she’ll go there straight from County Match Week, where she’ll be representing Buckinghamshire. “So, I’m going to have lots of golf that week!” she said. “This is my first national final and I’m really looking forward to it, it will be a very good experience.” Charlotte, who works at Sunningdale Golf Club, has played golf since she was about eight and is currently benefitting from time she spent at a tournament golf college in Portugal. “It definitely helped my game,” she said, explaining that last season she reduced her handicap from a high six to 2.6. This year, her target is scratch. This was the fourth of six Regional Medal Finals. The East, South and Midlands North finals have already taken place and the other dates are: North at Houghton-Le-Spring, Durham on 21 May; South West at Forest Hills, Gloucestershire on 25 May. Midlands South regional medal final qualifying scores Tadmarton Heath Par 71, CSS 74 r/o 74 Charlotte Nutt (Beaconsfield), Ji-Young Kim (Flackwell Heath)    75 Jenny Gibson (Woburn), Susan Harrison (Harewood Downs)    76 Linda Hunt (Newbury & Crookham), Jane Bennett (Lee-on-the-Solent),  Lema Townsend (Overstone Park), June Morgan (Langdon Hills), Susan Woolaway (Churchill & Blakedown)    77 Harriet Matthews (Droitwich) Click here for the full scores 15 May 2014 Charlotte wins qualifer by a whisker last_img read more

Ace play at boys’ county finals

first_img Durham and Wiltshire hold the advantage after today’s foursomes at the final of the Boys’ County Championship – despite an ace display from Northamptonshire’s Callum Farr.The 17-year-old, who was playing with Ben Jones against Durham, holed his tee shot on the 133-yard fifth hole. Farr’s shot, with a seven-iron, was his third hole in one, but his first in competition and it put the pairing one up. It also set them on course for an emphatic 6/4 win and maintained their 100 per cent winning record in the championship so far.But Durham had the upper hand in both the other matches and went in for lunch with a 2-1 lead, with Chris Handy and Will Marshall winning 5/3, while Jack Ainscough and Tom Skelton were 5/4 winners.Wiltshire were on the back foot after yesterday’s foursomes, but surged back in the singles to halve their match under pressure – and showed the same character this morning to lead Hampshire 2-1.Both teams had a win apiece and Wiltshire’s Dom Burgess and Tom Stagg were clear leaders in the final game, getting to four up after 14 holes. But Hampshire’s Jason Stokes and Josh Sturt were far from finished and won the 15th, 16th and 17th with a run of birdie, birdie, par to reduce the deficit to one hole.However, the Wiltshire par stopped the charge with a par four on the last, which halved the hole and gave them a one-up win.Click here for full scores. 26 Aug 2015 Ace play at boys’ county finals last_img read more