Field goals

first_imgWhen Chris LeRoy ’11 got a talking-to from his coach, he listened.“Coach Murphy talked to me in the off-season about becoming a tougher, nastier player on the field, and I applied that as much as I could,” said the center offensive lineman. “The difference between this year and last year is the intensity in which I approach football.”Now LeRoy, who has played football since age 8, is experiencing his first year as a starter with the Crimson. He saw no action on the field as a freshman, but worked his way up, appearing in three games as a sophomore, and nine as a junior.And as a senior, LeRoy’s hard work paid off just in time.“I made a conscious effort to give 110 percent effort. Working hard has always come naturally to me,” the 6-foot-3, 290-pound LeRoy said.Tim Murphy, Thomas Stephenson Family Head Coach for Harvard Football, said LeRoy “has developed into an All-Ivy caliber player.”In the spring, the government concentrator was awarded the Matt Birk Most Improved Offensive Line Award. LeRoy stuck around Harvard over the summer, too, working out and training for the season.“Throughout the preseason, this being my last year, I’ve tried to embrace every opportunity, and tried to be a leader,” he said. “I just really wanted to make my last season a memorable one.”“I come from a football family,” said LeRoy, who grew up in Portland, Maine. His father, a former teacher at Deering High School, played college ball for the University of Maine and was also an assistant football coach for LeRoy, who played during high school. LeRoy’s mother was a swimmer for the University of Maine, and his sister rows for Boston University.“I love the intensity and camaraderie of football,” said LeRoy. “I think it’s a very unique sport in that one person cannot win a game for you. With basketball, if you have a great player, he can take care of things. But in football, you need everybody to do their job correctly in order to be successful.”After football, LeRoy is looking forward to returning to another love: the piano.“Between football and school, my playing has gone way down,” he said.LeRoy began piano lessons when he was 7. “My mom is a big music person,” he revealed. “She really encouraged my sister and myself to get involved with singing and piano.”Football, singing, piano . . . what else? “I also love to dance.”With graduation looming, LeRoy plans to pursue a job in business or law, eventually enrolling in law school.But until then, it’s football all the time, and being a powerhouse isn’t easy. There’s schoolwork and practice to balance, not to mention sleep — and thousands and thousands of calories. For breakfast, LeRoy typically eats “two omelets, another pile of scrambled eggs, home fries, banana, orange juice, yogurt, fruit salad …”Harvard House masters refer to LeRoy and his teammates as “the wall of flesh.”But for LeRoy, it’s all worth it.“When you’re on the field, nothing else really matters.”The Crimson go up against Princeton University on Oct. 23. For a complete schedule, visit GoCrimson.last_img read more

Australian LNG export value to hit A$50 bln in FY18-19

first_imgThe value of Australian LNG exports are forecast to hit A$50.4 billion ($35.7 billion) in 2018-2019 as export volumes rise along with the prices. According to a report from the Australian government’s Office of the Chief Economist, the value will jump almost A$20 billion compared to the financial year 2017-18 when it reached A$31 billion.The value is expected to remain at the A$50 billion mark for the FY2019-20.Australia expects to overtake Qatar as the world’s largest explorer during the FY2019-20 when exports are forecast to hit 78.3 million tons, up from 61.7 million tones in 2017-2018.This represents a 1 percent forecast increased compared to the volumes forecasted in the September report.Higher export volumes will be driven by the Wheatstone, Ichthys and Prelude LNG projects, the report shows.Production at Wheastone will be substantially higher in 2018–19 than in 2017–18, with the project having ramped up to near full capacity last quarter. Ichthys shipped its first LNG cargo in October, and train 2 is expected online in 2019.Shell has indicated that the Prelude project will begin LNG production before the end of 2018, although this had not occurred at the time of writing, the report says.Forecast LNG export earnings have been revised up by $2.0 billion in 2018–19 and $1.6 billion in 2019–20 since the September Resources and Energy Quarterly.last_img read more

Sunman-Dearborn middle school student wins State Geography Bee

first_imgST. LEON, Ind. — A student at Sunman-Dearborn middle school recently won the State Geography Bee.Audio Playerhttp://wrbiradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Dylan.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.That’s Dylan Schutte, an 8th grader.Dylan will go to Washington, DC in May to compete in the National Geography Bee after winning the state contest in Indianapolis on March 31.Dylan competed against over 100 other middle school students from across the state.Aaron Jackson, one of Dylan’s coach says the school is excited for him.Audio Playerhttp://wrbiradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Aaron.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Everyone at WRBI wishes Dylan good luck!last_img

Key players’ injuries have further derailed Syracuse’s season

first_imgSydney Brackett sat a foot out of bounds beyond Syracuse’s goal line with her right leg extended, her shirt collar in her mouth and tears in her eyes. The junior had just rolled her right ankle while tracking down Notre Dame’s Brianna Martinez on Oct. 13, and dropped to the ground. Assistant athletic trainer Meagan Bevins tended to her and Brackett limped slowly behind the goal and to the sidelines.Across the field in front of SU’s bench, SU head coach Phil Wheddon stared blankly into the distance with his mouth open and hand on his face. Again, one of the Orange’s key players was down. First, leading scorer Kate Hostage missed three games after suffering an injury against Duke on Sept. 16. Less than three weeks later, goalkeeper Lysianne Proulx was ruled out for the season with a hip injury. Now, Brackett, a leader of the offense, was gone.“Player after player, it seems like it’s a weekly occurrence,” Wheddon said about SU’s injuries. “It’s been a little bit demoralizing for everyone. It’s been an arduous journey.”Injuries to key players have only made Syracuse’s (3-14, 0-9 Atlantic Coast) historically bad season harder. Between limited depth, players playing out of position and late-game fatigue, injuries have had a “massive impact” on SU’s performances, Wheddon said. The growing list of hurt players has contributed to the Orange’s current 12-game losing streak.When Syracuse suffered 4-0 losses to Harvard and Penn State in late August and early September, Wheddon had numbers on the bench, using seven or more substitutions in both games. In recent blowout losses to North Carolina, Notre Dame and Virginia, Wheddon has only used five substitutes due to a lack of numbers to call on.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We haven’t had the depth on the roster that we’d like to have,” Georgia Allen said. “In a perfect world, we’d have everybody fit. We can’t press for 90 minutes.”The Orange’s injuries have their biggest impact in the final 15 minutes of a game, Wheddon said. Players are fatigued and can’t always be rotated out, which results in lots of conceding. In conference play, 10 of Syracuse’s 34 goals allowed have come in the final quarter-hour of play. In consecutive games against UNC and Notre Dame on Oct. 7 and 13, SU surrendered a combined six goals in the final 15 minutes.Laura Angle | Digital Design EditorThe lack of depth also forced the Orange to play out of position. Abby Jonathan, SU’s starting center back for the first nine games of the season, was shifted to striker against Duke after Hostage went down. Allen started the season as a center midfielder, but has mostly played striker in conference play. Defender Taylor Bennett has left the backline and roamed upfield more frequently, registering a shot in six of the Orange’s last seven games.For the healthy players, seeing a teammate grimace in pain and not return to the game takes an emotional toll.“We have to try and protect the players,” Wheddon said. “Student-athlete welfare is the main thing, not pushing them to the point that they break.”While Syracuse’s injury troubles have primarily affected its performance in games, they have, at times, altered how SU practices, too. At the end of each session, the Orange has an intrasquad scrimmage. When three or more injured players are on the sidelines in a sweatshirt and sweatpants, it makes simulating a live, 11 versus 11 game impossible for Syracuse’s 23-player roster.SU’s injuries have been unavoidable, Wheddon said, as none of them have occurred in practice, while most have been caused by contact in games. The players and coaches have exercised caution in training and are doing their best to distribute minutes so nobody is worked too hard. Yet players continue to drop.“It’s really hard to watch your best players go down,” Hostage said. “It’s not fun for anyone. But it’s part of the game, it’s something we’ve had to deal with.” Comments Published on October 24, 2018 at 10:32 pm Contact David: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more