Sterling Bank Plc (STERLN.ng) Q32017 Presentation

first_imgSterling Bank Plc (STERLN.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2017 presentation results for the third quarter.For more information about Sterling Bank Plc (STERLN.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Sterling Bank Plc (STERLN.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Sterling Bank Plc (STERLN.ng)  2017 presentation results for the third quarter.Company ProfileSterling Bank Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria offering banking products and services to the corporate and commercial sectors as well as high net-worth individuals, small businesses and joint venture partnerships. The company provides a full-service offering for consumer and commercial banking as well as corporate, investment and wholesale banking. This includes loans and advances, letters of credit, equipment leasing, money market operations and electronic banking as well as financial advisory and securities trading services. The company was founded in 1960 and formerly known as NAL Bank Plc. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Sterling Bank Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

An activist, an Anglican, a political leader

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Tags Anglican Communion Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Comments (1) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 5, 2013 at 7:45 pm I’m pleased to ‘meet’ Elizabeth May and have a glimpse of thelr understanding on how she is and can be a Christian in political life. Thanks to Marites N. Sison for an insightful story. As an Anglican Franciscan journalist working ecumenically and on an interfaith basis, I have often been shy about wearing my Franciscan Tau cross in public. I am employed by a state media agency in a Buddhist country. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Marites N. SisonPosted Aug 5, 2013 Rector Collierville, TN An activist, an Anglican, a political leader Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY “Being a Christian in politics is part of who I am as a person, so I don’t hide it,” says Green Party leader Elizabeth May, who is a parishioner at St. Andrew’s Anglican church in Sidney, B.C. Photo: Green Party of Canada[Anglican Journal] At a time — at least in Canada — when having an active faith is considered a liability for politicians, Elizabeth May stands out for being openly Anglican.May, leader of the Green Party of Canada, is known for environmental activism as equally as she is for declaring her faith.“In the U.S., if you’re a not out-of-the-closet practicing Christian, you almost have no chance of being elected,” says May with a laugh in an interview. “It’s the opposite in Canada. I get flak for being a Christian.”And so she finds herself having to stress over and over again that her party is a secular organization that welcomes supporters “of all faiths and of no faith.”But even if she has found herself in tight corners — like being confronted by angry Canadians who object to her wearing the Celtic cross given to her by her late mother — May says that her faith is such an important part of her life that she remains unfazed. “It’s the source of my strength in dealing with somewhat insurmountable odds — this profound belief that the impossible is possible.”Wearing her faith on her sleeve, May believes, is also a matter of honesty and transparency. “I’m not trying to impose a religious agenda…Being a Christian in politics is part of who I am as a person, so I don’t hide it.”May came to her faith “sort of on my own.” Born in Connecticut in 1954 to a British father and an American mother, May and her family didn’t attend church regularly. She was a toddler when her mother left an Episcopalian church after a falling out with the minister, who refused to circulate one of her petitions to end nuclear weapons testing. They attended some Quaker meetings, but when they met refusal of “some other worthy request,” off they went again. “So we ended up having kind of a general knowledge of Christianity in the family,” recalls May.At 13, May decided she wanted to become Episcopalian. But that was only after she dropped the idea of becoming Jewish. “A friend of mine was Jewish and was going to have her Bat Mitzvah, and her father was a rabbi who was a very close friend of my mother through the peace movement. I thought I should just become Jewish,” recalls May. She made an appointment with the rabbi, who patiently quizzed her on her religious beliefs.  He came to the conclusion that while she was welcome in his community, he thought she had formed “a much closer relationship with Jesus Christ than you think you have and you will miss it.”May followed his advice to call the Episcopal church closest to home, and coincidentally, they had confirmation classes for her age.  Shortly after confirmation, May volunteered as a Sunday school teacher, and so began her faith journey that continued even after her family moved to Nova Scotia when she was 18.“I’m very comfortable in the Anglican church. The element of it that I appreciate the most would apply to many Protestant churches — inclusiveness, tolerance,” she says. “I’m certainly pleased that we have women priests, that we have blessings of same-sex marriages.” While the church can always do more, May adds that she feels proud when it comes out front on issues such as Indian residential schools and climate change.May also finds “tremendous joy” in parish life, so much so that before she entered politics, she studied to become a priest. She was halfway through her theological studies at Saint Paul University, in Ottawa, but had to abandon them as the demands of being leader of an emerging party grew.In 2011, May made history by becoming the first Green Party candidate to be elected to the House of Commons. “Foolishly, I thought I could start taking courses again,” she says. But the job of trying to effect change in Parliament has been a full-time one and could take at least a decade or more, says May. “I think I’d be very much too old. I was at the borderline anyway,” she laughs. “It’s been a good experience studying theology and I would love to do it again just out of interest.”Now a parishioner at St. Andrew’s Anglican Church in Sidney, B.C., May is still on the parish rolls of St. George’s Anglican Church in New Glasgow, N.S., her former home. On the rare occasions when she’s in Ottawa, she worships at Church of St. Bartholomew.But May says she could be anywhere across Canada or around the world, and know that she can attend any Anglican parish. “I enjoy the Sundays when we use the BCP [Book of Common Prayer] because it reminds me of my childhood and I love the language. But I really think the BAS [Book of Alternative Services] is wonderful,” says May. “I appreciate the ways in which the church is evolving in the modern world.”May recalls hearing then-Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams speak forcefully about climate change at the U.N. conference on climate change in Copenhagen in 2009. “He said, ‘to tell lies about climate change is to tell lies about God and it’s blasphemy,’ ” says May. “I just got chills and thought, ‘Oh, my God, I belong to the Anglican church and we’ve got this radical Archbishop of Canterbury, and isn’t he wonderful?”The Anglican Church is going through tough times as congregations and finances dwindle, but May remains hopeful. It can only be good for organized religion “to have to go through some difficult times, so that we actually are not the comfortable pew, the status church, but actually rebuild ourselves [as we consider] what’s the point here?” she says. “What are we challenged to do in the world in a time of climate crisis, a time of suffering and poverty?” If the church is not about making a difference in the world, “then we’ve abandoned Christ’s purpose for us on earth,” she adds.A few of the people whose work May says have greatly influenced her faith and worldview include Thomas Berry, the late Catholic priest and eco theologian; Matthew Fox, American priest and theologian; and Brian Swimme, mathematical cosmologist. Berry, says May, expounds on the notion that “it is important for us to see ourselves…in an evolutionary context as being co-creators in this quite mysterious creation where God’s hands and our hands can be working together.”May, herself an author of seven books, has also been inspired by the spiritual writings of the Dalai Lama and by Buddhist writer Pema Chödrön, resident and teacher of Gampo Abbey on Cape Breton Island.“I don’t exclusively read Christian text,” she adds, citing how Karen Armstrong’s books A History of God and The Battle for God have helped her to understand the modern context around fundamentalism, whether Christian, Islamic or Jewish.May says she wishes there were more “out-of-the-closet Christian left people,” because the Christian right is where most people identify in the political context.“I’m very comfortable with being what I think of as a progressive person who embraces science, who understands evolution, supports a woman’s right to choose, all of these issues,” she says.These days when she’s at a service, May says she latches on “more than anything else” to a phrase in the doxology recited by Anglicans, taken from Ephesians 3:20: “…God’s power working in us can infinitely do more than we can ask or imagine.”May says that is “a profoundly empowering, hopeful message, because if we deal only with those things that we can ask or imagine in our current knowledge-based, secular economic sense, then our kids don’t have any future.” Lance Woodruff says: Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Mensaje de Navidad de 2014 de la Obispa Primada de…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Dec 8, 2014 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL [8 de diciembre de 2014] La obispa primada de la Iglesia Episcopal, Katharine Jefferts Schori, ruega en su mensaje de Navidad de 2014: “Que Cristo renazca en ustedes en esta temporada navideña. Que su luz arda en ustedes y que laboren para propagarla en la oscuridad”.Sigue aquí el mensaje de la Obispa Primada:Mensaje de Navidad de 2014En un oficio inglés de Adviento, las colgaduras del altar eran de azul oscuro y encima se destacaba este letrero: “Te damos gracias de que la oscuridad nos recuerda la luz”. Frente a todos los que estábamos reunidos allí para dar gracias había imágenes de criaturas de la noche —una mariposa nocturna, un búho, un tejón y un murciélago— criaturas crípticas y de alguna manera misteriosas que sólo pueden encontrarse en la oscuridad.Mientras mengua la luz de los días y los cielos del otoño, muchos en el Hemisferio Norte asocian la oscuridad con los fantasmas y los esqueletos de las celebraciones seculares de Halloween. Esa iglesia inglesa ha recobrado la conexión entre el creador, la creación y la potencial santidad de todo lo que existe. Es una adecuada reorientación hacia la venida de Uno que ha alterado esas relaciones hacia nuevas posibilidades de restauración y redención.El Adviento nos conduce a la oscuridad y la luz decreciente. Nuestros cuerpos imperceptiblemente asumen un ritmo más lento según los días se hacen más cortos y las noches más largas, y la alegría y la frenética actividad que nos rodea con frecuencia no son más que señales de una anhelante apetencia de luz y de restauración y plenitud.La Encarnación, la venida de Dios entre nosotros en carne humana, ocurrió en un lugar tan tranquilo y apartado que pocos lo advirtieron al principio. Sin embargo, el impacto en la existencia humana ha sido como un rayo resplandeciente que sigue aumentando y generando nueva vida y fuego en todo el que comparte esa apetencia.Jesús está entre nosotros como una inquieta mariposa nocturna —¿advertiremos su presencia en el indigente?  Él atraviesa la oscuridad como un búho silencioso que busca comida para sus pichones hambrientos e indefensos. Derribará los injustos cimientos de este mundo como los tejones que socaban una pared torcida. Como el sonar de un murciélago, su llamado nos llega a cada uno de nosotros en particular —¿hemos oído su apremiante “ven y sígueme”?Dios está entre nosotros, y en nosotros y en torno nuestro, encontrando, alentando, amando y transformando al mundo y sus criaturas hacia el glorioso sueño que los pastores anunciaron hace tantísimos años, hacia la amada comunidad de sueños proféticos y la ronda nocturna que proclama “todo bien, no teman, el Señor está aquí”.Que Cristo renazca en ustedes en esta temporada navideña. Que su luz arda en ustedes y que laboren para propagarla en la oscuridad. El pueblo que andaba en tinieblas ha visto una gran luz y es el heraldo de la paz para toda la creación.Rvdma. Katharine Jefferts SchoriObispa Presidente y PrimadaDe la Iglesia Episcopal Rector Martinsville, VA Mensaje de Navidad de 2014 de la Obispa Primada de la Iglesia Episcopal Que Cristo renazca en ustedes en esta temporada navideña Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Episcopales se suman a la marcha de las  ‘naciones nativas’…

first_img Standing Rock An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Indigenous Ministries, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Dakota Access Pipeline, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cientos si no miles de personas llenaron las calles de Washington, D.C. para la marcha y concentración de las Naciones Nativas en Pie el 10 de marzo. Foto de: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Nota de la redacción: Hay una galería de fotos aquí.[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Episcopales y otras personas que desfilaron aquí el 10 de marzo, en medio de la lluvia helada, en la marcha y concentración de las Naciones Nativas en Pie, lo hicieron siguiendo el patrón tradicional de primero la oración y luego la acción.El obispo de Dakota del Norte, Michael Smith, que creció en Oklahoma y es un potowatomí registrado, abrió el oficio Enhiestos como Piedra [Standing as Stone] en la Catedral Nacional de Washington. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.El obispo de Dakota del Norte, Michael Smith, dio inicio a un oficio de oración de casi dos horas el 9 de marzo en la Catedral Nacional de Washington, la víspera de la marcha, bosquejando el patrón a seguir. “Para gente de fe, trabajar por la justicia incluye tanto la oración como la acción. Oramos y luego actuamos, y luego volvemos a orar y a actuar y oramos de nuevo y actuamos hasta que el Dios Creador, que ha hecho todo lo que es, proporcione eso por lo que trabajamos”, dijo Smith, miembro registrado en la nación potowatomí de Oklahoma. “Esta noche oramos; mañana actuamos”.Al día siguiente, la Rda. Phyllis Manoogian, diácona y misionera de la Diócesis de California en Guatemala, llevaba puesto un poncho naranja brillante para protegerse de la lluvia helada que caía mientras la marcha descendía frente a la sede central del Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU. Ella viajó a Washington, D.C., desde la aldea cerca de Antigua donde contó que enseña a mujeres indígenas y a sus hijos, porque la solidaridad con la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta epitomiza el llamado del Movimiento de Jesús.“Creo que la Iglesia Episcopal ha estado en la cola de muchos eventos sociales, y creo que es importante que subamos y seamos líderes, no seguidores”, dijo ella mientras los manifestantes doblaban por la esquina cercana a la sede central del Buró Federal de Investigaciones y bajaban la cuadra para detenerse frente al nuevo Hotel Internacional Trump. Es parte de la idiosincrasia cristiana cuidar de otros y ser buenos mayordomos de la Tierra, y amar a nuestro prójimo”.La marcha y concentración atrajo a millares de personas de Arizona, Nuevo México, Illinois y Nueva York, así como de las Dakotas. Mientras los manifestantes nativos y sus aliados desfilaban a través del centro de Washington, D.C., Energy Transfer Partners (la compañía constructora del oleoducto] estaba trabajando en Dakota del Norte. Respaldada por un dictamen judicial favorable el 7 de marzo, la compañía se dispone a comenzar a bombear petróleo la semana próxima a través del último segmento del oleoducto de 1886 kilómetros de largo y 72 centímetros de diámetro, que recientemente perforó debajo del lago Oahe [un embalse] del río Misurí a un kilómetro de la reserva de Roca Enhiesta.Un gran contingente de episcopales se unió a la marcha en el D.C. Laicos, sacerdotes y seminaristas del vecino Seminario Teológico de Virginia llevaban carteles y coreaban consignas que proclamaban que eran solidarios con Roca Enhiesta y que los niños no podían beber petróleo.El grupo incluía a obispos con raíces indígenas o ministerio con pueblos indígenas. Además de Smith, marcharon el obispo de la Diócesis de Dakota del Sur John Tarrante, la obispa auxiliar de la Diócesis de Montana; el obispo de Navajolandia David Bailey y el obispo de la Diócesis de Alaska Mark Lattime.Episcopales en la manifestación, de izquierda a derecha, Joshua Floberg, la Rda. Lauren Stanley, la Rda. Phyllis Manoogian, el Rdo. John Floberg y John Michael Floberg llevan la bandera episcopal la marcha y concentración de las Naciones Nativas en Pie el 10 de marzo. Foto cortesía de Lauren Stanley.La ruta de 3 kilómetros terminó en la plaza Lafayette en la avenida Pennsylvania frente a la Casa Blanca. Los manifestantes se mantuvieron de pie en la calle bajo la mirada escrutadora de la policía que no interfirió en nada. Al menos dos personas vestidas de negro observaban a la multitud desde el techo de la Casa Blanca.Mientras los oradores expresaban su oposición al oleoducto en la concentración, la Rda. Cornelia Eaton, sacerdote de Navajolandia que está en su segundo año en el VTS, dijo que el Pacto Bautismal hace que la protección del agua sea una tarea esencial para los episcopales.“[El Pacto Bautismal] habla al espíritu de quienes somos y de cómo Dios nos ha llamado a vivir en este lugar de ruptura y de retos”, dijo ella.Los episcopales y el pueblo indígena deben seguir construyendo relaciones, de manera que empiecen a aprender unos de otros y a adentrarse en lo que su cultura denomina “el camino de la armonía, el camino de la bendición” de vivir unos con otros y con el mundo, afirmó ella. Creo que es lo que Dios nos llama a ser y a convertirnos. Ese es el deseo de Dios para el pueblo de Dios”.El oleoducto se supone que transporte hasta 470.000 barriles de petróleo al día desde los campos petrolíferos de Bakken en el noroeste de Dakota del Norte —a través de Dakota del Sur y Iowa— hasta Illinois para despacharlo a las refinerías. Los líderes tribales expresaron en repetidas ocasiones su preocupación por un posible derrame de petróleo que afectaría el suministro de agua de la reserva, así como la amenaza que el oleoducto constituía  para sus lugares sagrados y  los derechos territoriales pactados. Energy Transfer Partners, la compañía constructora con sede en Texas, dice que [el oleoducto] será más seguro que transportar el petróleo por carretera o por ferrocarril.El 8 de febrero, el Cuerpo de Ingenieros de EE.UU. que administra partes del río Misurí y las tierras aledañas, le dio permiso a Energy Transfer Partners para perforar el último tramo. El permiso se produjo a instancias del presidente Donald Trump que, en una de sus primeras actuaciones presidenciales, le dijo al Cuerpo de Ingenieros que adelantara el proyecto del oleoducto.El 7 de marzo, el juez James Boasberg, del tribunal federal del Distrito de Columbia, rechazó la demanda tribal de detener temporalmente la última sección del oleoducto por razones religiosas. Ahora, las tribus sioux de Roca Enhiesta y Río Cheyenne deben esperar que Boasberg dictamine sobre la sustancia de su demanda, un dictamen que puede que no se produzca hasta abril.La Nación Sioux de Roca Enhiesta, la Red Indígena Medioambiental y la Alianza de Organizadores Nativos organizaron la marcha Naciones Nativas en Pie y las actividades que la precedieron. Esas actividades incluyeron un campamento de tiendas indias a la sombra del Monumento a Washington con oradores y talleres culturales, y el oficio ecuménico e interreligioso “Enhiestos como piedra: Naciones indígenas y aliados se reúne en la Catedral Nacional de Washington” en la noche del 9 de marzo. En todo el país tuvieron lugar otros eventos en solidaridad.Algunos de los muchos episcopales que asistieron a la manifestación y concentración Naciones Nativas en Pie el 10 de marzo posan en la plaza Lafayette frente a la Casa Blanca. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Catolicorromanos, episcopales y miembros de al menos 11 denominaciones protestante y grupos afiliados apoyaron la marcha y la concentración. Dave Archambault II, presidente de los sioux de Roca Enhiesta, le pidió a John Floberg —sacerdote encargado de las congregaciones episcopales de la parte de la reserva que está en Dakota del Norte— que dirigiera las actividades de solidaridad de la comunidad religiosa.La Iglesia Episcopal ha defendido a la nación sioux contra la ruta del Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas desde el verano de 2016. Los episcopales de la localidad también han brindado un ministerio de presencia en Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte, y en sus alrededores, el punto focal de los grupos de “protectores del agua” u opositores del oleoducto, que se congregaron cerca del punto en que [el proyectado oleoducto] debía cruzar el lago Oahe. Estas reuniones atrajeron a miembros de cerca de 300 tribus en una muestra de unidad sin precedentes que resucitó el movimiento de los derechos indígenas en Estados Unidos.Los organizadores tenían tres objetivos para el evento de esta semana. El primero era que Trump se reuniera con los líderes tribales para oír el porqué el gobierno de EE.UU. debe respetar los derechos tribales. El segundo era dejar sentado que las tribus deben dar su consentimiento a obras de infraestructura como el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas. La consulta con los promotores y los funcionarios del gobierno no es suficiente, dijeron ellos. El tercer objetivo era tener una participación pujante de las tribus y sus aliados en una muestra de apoyo a la soberanía tribal con vistas a proteger sus territorios ancestrales y el medioambiente para las generaciones futuras.Dos hombres de un grupo de tamborileros y cantantes provenientes de la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta participan en el oficio “Enhiestos como roca: las naciones indígenas y sus aliados se reúnen en la Catedral Nacional de Washington”. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.La noche antes de la marcha, los tambores y los cantos indígenas llenaron la Catedral Nacional de Washington, y el olor del humo sagrado del pasto dulce pendía en el aire durante el oficio de oración.El oficio simbolizaba el esfuerzo de las iglesias cristianas de reconciliarse con los pueblos nativos, dijo el Rdo. Brandon Mauai, diácono de la Diócesis de Dakota del Norte y ex miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Todas las denominaciones han mostrado algún respaldo en el empeño de reconciliarse con la gente”, dijo él, añadiendo que el activismo en torno al oleoducto ha estimulado esos esfuerzos.“Ese es el rumbo por el que nosotros —la Iglesia— debemos proseguir” y el pueblo indígena debe colaborar con las intenciones de las iglesias, afirmó. “Nosotros —la Iglesia— seguiremos laborando por los derechos de la gente, la gente originaria de esta tierra, por los derechos de todas las personas”.Equilibrar las tradiciones espirituales sioux con las de la Iglesia siempre es difícil, reconoció Mauai,quien dijo que él ha estado en ambos lados, siendo testigo del trauma infligido a los indígenas en nombre de la propagación del cristianismo y luego sirviendo en los organismos gobernantes de la Iglesia e intentando de la mejor manera reconciliarla con los afectados por ese legado.El Rdo. Vine Deloria Sr., que fue miembro de la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta y el primero de su tribu en ser ordenado sacerdote episcopal, es uno de los pocos norteamericanos en tener una estatua en el retablo del altar mayor de la Catedral Nacional de Washington. Foto de la Catedral Nacional de Washington.Los feligreses experimentaron la encarnadura de parte de la larga asociación de la Iglesia Episcopal con las naciones sioux en la persona de Fe Águila Moteada [Faith Spotted Eagle], pariente de Vine Deloria Sr., un sioux de Roca Enhiesta y el primer miembro de una tribu india en ser ordenado sacerdote episcopal, y de su hijo, Vine Jr., notable teólogo y autor de “Custer murió por tus pecados: un manifiesto indio” [Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto]. Hasta el día del oficio, Águila Moteada sólo había oído mencionar, pero nunca había visto, la estatua del viejo Deloria, que es uno de los pocos norteamericanos que se incluyen en el retablo del altar mayor de la Catedral.Cuando los episcopales llegaron por primera vez a las reservas de los sioux, le dijo Águila Moteada a la congregación, los nativos reconocieron algunas cosas en común, porque tanto ellos como los episcopales apreciaban la ceremonia. En la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo ella, los sioux encontraron una práctica espiritual afín a sus creencias y prácticas tradicionales; creencias y prácticas que se hicieron clandestinas cuando algunos cristianos los obligaron a elegir entre las dos tradiciones.“Nuestros antepasados han llevado a cabo alguna obra juntos” dijo Águila Moteada, para reunir a los pueblos nativos y sus aliados. “Estoy segura de que los antepasados van a estar celebrando” mientras ven a la gente marchando juntas por las calles de la capital.Todo el oficio puede verse a continuación. El oficio mismo comienza cuando marca 1 hora, 40 minutos y 21 segundos.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora principal y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Servicecenter_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopales se suman a la marcha de las  ‘naciones nativas’ que protestan contra el oleoducto en la capital del país Manifestantes y aliados toman las frías calles para una manifestación bulliciosa y pacífica Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 10, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Cristal House / Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/485822/cristal-house-gomez-de-la-torre-and-guerrero Clipboard Architects: Gómez De La Torre & GuerreroInterior Design:Estudio Gomez De La Torre &GuerreroStructures:Ing. J. Francisco Barrantes BezoldPlumbing:Ing. Santiago E. Valentín SanchézElectrical:Ing. Jorge Luis Suca MezaSite Area:270.30 M2Project Architects:María Del Carmen Guerrero Yábar , Enrique Gomez De La TorreCity:LimaCountry:PeruMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!Courtesy of Gómez De La Torre & GuerreroRecommended ProductsDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemDoorsGorter HatchesRoof Hatch – RHT AluminiumText description provided by the architects. Designed as a project with great spatiality, this home is based on the concept of a large self-supporting glass box which supports the concrete roof, that surrounds it with side tranparencies, and with an aperture of a retractable roof that reinforces the idea of full transparency. Save this picture!Section AAThe house will be occupied all year despite being a temporary residence, thus it is equipped with a system that conditions the environments naturally. The central roof is operable to release hot air; the entry of cold air is allowed through the screens of the glass facade overlooking the sea. In winter, the entire glass box collects heat from the environment and as it remains closed, maintains the heat creating a greenhouse effect.Save this picture!Courtesy of Gómez De La Torre & GuerreroThis temporary residence, located in the first row on Señoritas beach, has a site area of ​​270.30 m2. The project proposes a house with integrated environments, spread over three levels, which are connected to the sea horizon view. The design is based on a central, double height living room – interior terrace, through which one can register the exterior. This terrace has a differentiated floor, a deck, where there is a jacuzzi and a retractable roof, made of translucent polycarbonate and aluminum, that will remain open in the summer and when closed, it will protect the house when it is uninhabited. In winter it protects from the cold, fostering a warm and lit atmosphere. At the same time, it allows for adequate cross ventilation to cool the house in high temperatures. We propose a large outdoor terrace with a deck and an elongated pool with a jacuzzi. A staircase leads to the outside, with direct access to the terrace and garage on the first floor .Save this picture!First LevelThe first level, where the garage is, has an open courtyard connected to the laundry, a bedroom with a bathroom and a service area with a bathroom and storage area. From there, a staircase connects the three levels of the house. The garage houses up to six cars. The second level includes the social environments, kitchen with pantry, and to the left, two bedrooms and the terrace area. The third level has a glass bridge that connects the left and right wings, and looks over the double height. To the right, overlooking the sea, is the master bedroom and bathroom. It has a large terrace. To the back, there is another bedroom with bathroom. On the left, at the front we propose a family room with terrace, and the back, another bedroom with bathroom. We include a corridor to an additional laundry for beachwear. Likewise, in the third bedroom, we have placed a ladder within a closet for tsunami emergency preparedness. Formally, the house has a large roof with a solid appearance. This contrasts with the lightness of the iron column structure of the living room. This roof, which covers the terraces in front of the bedrooms, favors them with the incidence of solar rays.Project gallerySee allShow lessHASSELL Wins Competition to Construct Landmark Tower in SydneyArchitecture NewsNew Shelter in Ruavieja / Sergio RojoSelected Projects Share Cristal House / Gómez De La Torre & GuerreroSave this projectSaveCristal House / Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero Save this picture!Courtesy of Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero+ 17 Share Cristal House / Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero Houses Peru “COPY”center_img Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/485822/cristal-house-gomez-de-la-torre-and-guerrero Clipboard CopyHouses•Lima, Peru ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeGómez De La Torre & GuerreroOfficeFollowProductsSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLimaPeruPublished on March 13, 2014Cite: “Cristal House / Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero” [Casa Cristal / Gómez De La Torre & Guerrero] 13 Mar 2014. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemArmchairsUniForArmchair – ParigiLouvers / ShuttersBruagShading Screens – Perforated Facade PanelsAluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Façade BladesCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemWire MeshJakobWebnet in a Gymnasium in GurmelsDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Pocket Door | MareaPaintKEIMMineral Paint for Concrete – KEIM Concretal®-WLouversReynaers AluminiumSolar ShadingHandlesFormaniFitting Collection – ARCMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream “COPY”last_img read more

Philanthropy Fortnight programme revealed

first_imgPhilanthropy Fortnight programme revealed Giving Northern Ireland has announced details of its second Philanthropy Fortnight which will run from 20th April to 1st May.Philanthropy Fortnight is designed to encourage philanthropy across a wide range of sectors in Northern Ireland.Professor Angela Eikenberry, renowned academic and Fulbright Scholar, will take part in a number of events including presenting a lecture on the impact of philanthropy and the cultural differences in giving between the United States of America and Northern Ireland.There will also be an event to recognise 30 years of corporate philanthropy in Northern Ireland by Lloyds Bank Foundation for Northern Ireland (formally Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland). Representatives from 30 organisations across the sector will explore common challenges and future needs in order to inform the Foundation’s ongoing grant making in Northern Ireland.Philanthropy Fortnight will include sessions on giving circles and the role of professional advisers.Philanthropy Fortnight 2015 runs from 21 April to 1 May.Giving Northern Ireland was set up with support from The Atlantic Philanthropies and Lloyd’s Bank Foundation to encourage the growth of philanthropy in Northern Ireland. Howard Lake | 14 April 2015 | News Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Ireland Northern Ireland AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  31 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Planning for the Future, First Stop: Your Lender

first_img Planning for the Future, First Stop: Your Lender Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Planning for the Future, First Stop: Your Lender By Gary Truitt – Aug 25, 2016 Previous articleAlgeria Returns to U.S. CornNext articleSouthwest Indiana Soybeans have Chance for Great Yielding Year Gary Truitt SHARE Facebook Twitter Planning for the Future, First Stop: Your LenderThis is the time of year to begin to think about the 2017 production season, and your lender needs to part of that process. Byron Bennett, VP of Risk Management with Farm Credit Mid-America, says your lender can be a  resource to help you with a variety of business decisions, “A lender can provide you with a lot of good perspectives on the interest rate market and what they see on the horizon that will allow you to make the best decision for the future of your operation.”  He told HAT he cannot predict the future of interest rates, but says they are not likely to go any lower.Bennett says choosing the right lender is more than picking the lowest interest rates, “Your lender should be able to deliver meaningful value to your operation and have some deep history in your industry.” He added a good lender should be able and willing to provide you with insights and useful recommendations about your operation.Financial decisions become critical in these tough economic times. Bennett says your lender can be a partner in giving you and perspectives on how your operation fits into the industry as a whole, “They can tell you what they are seeing in the market and what peers are doing, any trends they are focused on.” Get more financial tips and recommendations from Farm Credit Mid-America at e-farmcredit.com.last_img read more

Pasadena-Altadena Chapter of the Links, Inc. Hosts “Our Daughters Are Not For Sale”, A Human Trafficking Forum

first_img Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Pasadena-Altadena Chapter of the Links, Inc. Hosts “Our Daughters Are Not For Sale”, A Human Trafficking Forum STAFF REPORT Published on Wednesday, February 5, 2020 | 5:28 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week Members of the Links Inc. in attendance were (Center, front row, from left): Yvonne Hill, Chapter President Charmayne Mills-Ealy, Barbara Coleman, Dorothy Jean Hays, Event Chair Barbara Bigby; (Back row, from left): Cheryl Myers, Ashana Thorman, Hilarie Dyson-Green, Jocelyn Bradley.On Saturday, January 11, 2020, the “National Human Trafficking Day”, the Pasadena Altadena Chapter of the Links, Inc. presented a forum on the critical topic of Human Sex Trafficking. The forum entitled, “Our Daughters Are Not for Sale” was held at the Robinson Park Recreation Center in Pasadena CA. The key speakers (on far left): Angelica Gomez and Dr. Stephany Powell (Area Chair for the Human Trafficking Initiative). The Forum had over 100 attendees; young ladies, aged 12 and up, their parents, caregivers and community leaders.About The Pasadena Altadena Chapter of the Links, IncorporatedThe Pasadena Altadena Chapter of the Links, Incorporated celebrates 57 years as a women’s volunteer service organization committed to enriching, sustaining and ensuring the cultural and economic survival of African Americans and other persons of African ancestry here in Pasadena. A premier community service organization with 52 Active and Alumnae members in our local chapter with a legacy of friends providing service that changes lives. The members of The Links, Incorporated are influential decision makers and opinion leaders.The Links, Incorporated is focused on creating transformational programming and impacting lives in communities of color through Services to Youth, The Arts, National Trends and Services, International Trends and Services, and Health and Human Services. We improve the quality of life for individuals, families and communities. The Links, Incorporated: “Linked in Friendship, Connected in Service.” For more information, visit our website: http://pasadenaaltadenalinksinc.org Community News 5 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities Who’ve Lost Their FandomsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyPretty Or Not: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAt 9 Years Old, This Young Girl Dazzled The World Of FashionHerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community Newscenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Subscribe More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

After losing a company to COVID, owners seek the next gig

first_img After losing a company to COVID, owners seek the next gig By Digital AIM Web Support – February 21, 2021 WhatsApp Twitter TAGS  Pinterest Facebook Twittercenter_img Gregory BullAlex Willen brings out treats for his dogs at his home, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021, in San Diego. Willen was preparing to open a dog boarding business when the pandemic hit. Willen sensed the virus outbreak wouldn’t end quickly, which meant dog owners wouldn’t be traveling and many would keep working at home, eliminating the need for his services. He decided to restart a business he’d shelved in favor of boarding, dog treats. WhatsApp Local NewsBusinessUS News Pinterest Previous articleWashington shuts down California late for 62-51 victoryNext articleSam Burns holds his own on a tough, windy day at Riviera Digital AIM Web Support Facebooklast_img read more

“Social distancing is here for the long haul” – Nolan

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 WhatsApp Twitter Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Pinterest Facebook Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterest Facebook Google+center_img Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter “Social distancing is here for the long haul” – Nolan A senior member of the National Public Health Emergency Team says we must make a long term commitment to social distancing.Hospital numbers had reached 130 yesterday evening, seven of them in Letterkenny University Hospital. That’s up from two earlier in the week, with none of them in intensive care.Chair of NPHET’s Covid modelling group, Professor Philip Nolan says sustained adherence to guidelines is the only answer……..Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/07nolan-virus.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Previous articleEducation Minister apologises for Leaving Cert results mistakeNext articleWindow of Opportunity to halt Covid spread is closing – Glynn News Highland By News Highland – October 1, 2020 WhatsApp Google+last_img read more